046: The Best Personality Types for Online Summits with Brit Kolo

Curious as to whether a summit is the right move for you? In this episode with Brit Kolo, we're chatting about the personality types best fit for hosting a summit.

We'll cover an overview of the personality types, which personality types will have the easiest time hosting a summit, and what to do if you are more cut out for either the planning or hosting stage.

Transcript

Krista:
Hey, Hey. Welcome to the Summit Host Hangout podcast where you'll learn how to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit, no influence or status necessary. I'm your host, Krista from Summit in A Box, and we're currently in a series about hosting an online summit as an introvert. Today in episode 46, we're opening the series beyond just introverts to bring in a special guest to talk about the personality types that tend to be the best for planning a summit.

Krista:
In this episode, we'll cover an overview of what the personality types are in case you need a little help figuring out where you stand. We're going to talk about what personality types are best fit for hosting a summit, as well as which are the best fit for just certain pieces, either the planning or the hosting, and then what to do if it's not the best fit for you.

Krista:
Our guest has so much incredible information. To give you some background on her, she is the creator of the Marketing Personality Type Framework at MarketingPersonalities.com and the host of the Marketing Personalities podcast. Through her framework, designed to match you with your best marketing strategy based on your Myers–Briggs personality type, she's here to shake up your approach to marketing and inspire you to grow your business in a feel good way. Today, we're going to apply her expertise specifically to summits. So let's dive in and talk with Brit Kolo. Hey Brit, welcome. I'm so excited to have you on today.

Brit Kolo:
Hello. Thanks for having me.

Krista:
This is going to be great. I'm seriously so pumped about this topic. It's like, I don't know, I'm just fascinated by it. So this is going to be a lot of fun, but before we get into the real good stuff, tell us a little bit about you and your business.

About Brit

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. Okay. So hi listeners, my name is Brit, obviously. I'm the founder of Marketing Personalities. I'm a speaker. I am a podcast host. I'm kind of really fascinated with the whole idea of personality types. The short story of what I do is, is I've basically melded the two worlds of personality types and marketing. I've played with them a little bit to see how they interact with each other and how we might find what your best marketing strategy is based on your personality type. So that's what I do and that's what I get to talk about all day because I'm so fascinated by it just like you are.

Krista:
Yeah. I'm really excited for the person listening who has never heard of this or thought of it before to just have their minds blown right now. But for anyone listening who isn't familiar with what personality types are and how they work, can you tell us a little bit about that and then where someone can go to figure out what their personality type is?

Figuring out your personality type

Brit Kolo:
Yeah, sure. I really like to start here too because it's fun to jump in and talk about the marketing and how it relates to personality types, but if you don't know the basic foundation of, "Wait, what is my personality type?" it won't make any sense. So there are plenty of assessments out there to tell you essentially about yourself. My marketing personality type framework is based on the Myers–Briggs type indicator. That's kind of what I would call the gold standard of personality type assessments. It's been used for many decades and most people, even if you don't really know much about personality types or psychology, you probably recognize the name Myers–Briggs and you've probably taken the Myers–Briggs assessment or something like it maybe as you were coming out of high school trying to figure out what to do in college or maybe right after you were hired by an employer and the HR department reached out and said, "Hey, we need you take this assessment," and you found out what your personality type was.

Brit Kolo:
My framework is based off of Myers-Briggs. There are so many other types of assessments and personality type frameworks and indicators out there. For the sake of my framework and our conversation today, we'll be talking primarily about Myers-Briggs. If you're like, "Huh, I think I know my type or I think I knew my type at one point, but I'm not sure," the Myers–Briggs personality type is made up of four letters, if you will. The letters represent preferences within your just natural way you show up in the world. It's not a perfect science. I always preface all of this with that because I do get a considerable amount of questions kind of thinking that this personality type assessment thing is more of a science than... It's called an indicator for a reason or a framework for a reason. It's not perfect because there are over 7 billion people on the planet and just 16 personality types that we're working with, so this is not a perfect science.

Brit Kolo:
What it essentially does is it holds up a mirror in front of you to reflect back things about yourself that you already know, but you couldn't necessarily put your finger on or you couldn't necessarily put the perfect words to it, but then once the mirror is held up and you can see yourself, you're natural, just normal, how you feel best in the world and you just naturally show up in the world, once you get to see that and it's reflected to you, you become more self aware. You're able to speak about yourself a little bit differently, a little bit more accurately. Then the fun part happens where we get to take what we know about you and what feels good to you, what's natural to you and apply it to fun things like marketing. So that's what personality types are and that's kind of the gist.

Krista:
I love what you were saying there about how it's kind of like a mirror because I was listening to, I don't know, it was probably one of your podcast episodes about my personality type and you were pointing out how we are really good with templates and making them and using them in systems and all that stuff. I was like, "Holy smokes. I'm literally building a business where I am making this massive summit system and all of these templates for people and now I know why." I know why, it's just like the perfect thing ever and was so exciting. So I'm excited for people who are not familiar with this to get to have the same experience. Can you give us, I want to say quick, but the quickest walkthrough you can of what the personality types are?

Overview of the different personality types

Brit Kolo:
Yeah, definitely. Okay. Again, this is all based on the Myers–Briggs type indicator. So there are 16 personality types. Each personality type has those four letters. I call them letters because obviously they are letters, but they represent preferences. So just to give you an idea, my personality type is ENFJ and then what's yours Krista? Remind me what your letters are.

Krista:
ISFJ.

Brit Kolo:
ISFJ. Yeah, that's what I thought. So we have those four letters, those four preferences and those get to tell us a lot about who we naturally are. There are 16 combinations of these letters, of these four letters. I'll run through what each of the letters stands for so you can kind of get just a very high level layman's term view of what these things are and then you can start to, even if you don't know your personality type just yet, you can start to self identify, "Oh yeah, that kind of sounds more like me than that one," and and so forth.

Brit Kolo:
And I didn't answer this from before. If you aren't sure of what your Myers-Briggs type is, maybe you knew it before, but you can't remember or maybe you think you do know your type, but you just want to make sure; I highly recommend taking the assessment at 16personalities.com. It's a free assessment. I don't own that site. I have no affiliation with that site, but I just really love how they have their assessment built out and the results that they give you once you do take the assessment are so well done. I am so impressed with 16 personalities, so I would go there. That's linked on my homepage as well. So if you can't remember, you'll find it. Okay, so the different letters, let's go through those. So your first letter is either an I or an E. I stands for introvert, E stands for extrovert.

Brit Kolo:
Very common, right? I get so many questions about this because this is the most commonly known preference I think. But it's also one of the most misunderstood, honestly. Everybody knows about introverts and extroverts, so they think, but really there's a lot of misconceptions about these two preferences. What you need to know about these two is that it's all about how sensitive you are to external stimuli. It's not about how shy you are or how much you like to talk or not talk. It's not about how much you hate people or how much you love people. It's really about how innately sensitive you are to external stimuli. So introverts, as you might have guessed, are more sensitive to external stimuli and therefore, the symptom you kind of see from that is that they withdraw and they don't like to be externally stimulated because they're just fine on their own.

Brit Kolo:
Then extroverts aren't as sensitive to external stimuli. So they tend to seek out that stimuli to kind of get them going and get them energized. Right? Then the second letter is either an S or an N. S stands for observant. Some people say, "sensing," kind of goes back and forth and the other letter is N, which stands for intuitive. This is all about where you like to pay attention. Intuitive people prefer to pay attention to internal cues. Then observant sensing people prefer to pay attention to external cues, their surroundings rather than what's going on inside of them, their emotions, their thoughts, their feelings. Now the third letter is either a T or an F. T stands for thinking and F stands for feeling. This is all about where you prefer to make your decisions from. So thinkers prefer to make their decisions from their thoughts, data, history, what they can really put their finger on and and put into a spreadsheet.

Brit Kolo:
On the flip side, feelers prefer to make decisions based on what they're feeling. It might not make sense on a spreadsheet or logistically, so they still want to make that decision based on what they're feeling. Then finally, the fourth letter is either a J or a P. J stands for judging and P stands for perceiving. This is all about how and where you see clear or unclear boundaries. So let me tell you.. Let me explain what I mean by that. Js, that stands for judging. What I'm not saying there is judgmental. Js are not judgmental, they're judging. Really, a better word for that is discerning. So Js tend to see clear boundaries and more black and white. So because of that, when they look out at the world, they can make decisions a bit quicker. They tend to be a bit more quick to decide, discerning, that sort of thing.

Brit Kolo:
Then on the flip side, perceivers tend to prefer to stay more open and flexible. They look out at the world and they really see more gray area and not defined boundaries and lines. So because of that, they don't make decisions as quickly. They can still be self-assured. It's probably just going to take them a little bit longer to get there to make that solid decision simply because they just see a lot of gray out there and not clear black and white. Those are the four, well basically eight preferences and between those I and E and N and S and so forth, you can probably already start self identifying with what kind of feels right for you and then you can verify that by taking the assessment.

Krista:
I love that. I love how you broke that all down because I think people will totally be able to sit and say, "Okay, I'm this one, not this one, this one, not this one." So thank you so much for breaking that down. I want to jump into summits now since we have the stage set with these personality types. From your research and experience, are there personality types that are better fit to host a summit than others?

Are certain personality types better fit to host a summit?

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. Okay. Now we're getting to the gold here. From my perspective, I do believe that there are some personality types that are going to enjoy the summit, the building of the summit and the hosting of the summit more so than others. Now for the listener, you know this Krista, but for the listener I built a marketing personality type framework to show you what your best marketing strategy is based on your personality type. Because what I recognized was, you have all the options in the entire world. It has never been easier to find a way to market your business and grow your business. It's unreal and plus, we have so many online teachers out there teaching us how to market and grow and scale our businesses. So no doubt you have all the ideas in the world. You probably are thinking about hosting a summit because otherwise, why would you be listening? Right?

Brit Kolo:
But my goal here with the marketing personality type framework was to cut through the noise of all the options and therefore, all of the, "shoulds," around marketing and point you in the direction to the marketing strategy that you're going to feel best about implementing because, and this is at the really the core of my company and what we stand for, we believe that when I feel good, my audience feels good. That's basically become our rallying cry. When I feel good, my audience feels good, and it's true. You think about it, when you show up feeling good and in your power, in your flow, your audience naturally kind of leans in and they're like, "Hey, I like this person. They're kind of cool." They can trust you a little bit faster. By them knowing, liking and trusting you, marketing 101, they can buy from you, right? If one of those things isn't there, they're probably not going to buy.

Brit Kolo:
Now on the flip side, you show up kind of feeling fake, salesy, burnout, overwhelmed, not in your power, not in your flow; your audience is going to pick up on that energy as well. They're going to lean out. They're probably not going to like you so much. They're probably not going to trust you very quickly and you're hitting a wall. It's not going to work. So that's the basis of what we're trying to get to and then when we talk about summits, for sure I see a couple of things going on with summit. I don't want to oversimplify, but from my perspective there's the creating and the building of the summit. There's a lot of backend stuff that goes into a summit, so I've heard. I haven't hosted one yet. Then there's the actual hosting of it and those two things can feel quite different to me.

Brit Kolo:
I see some opportunities for specific personality types to absolutely love and thrive in this summit model. Then for sure, just like any other marketing strategy, there are going to be a few personality types that I really just wouldn't suggest going down the summit road because they're probably just not going to enjoy it. If you can't show up feeling good, your audience isn't going to feel good about that either, so you might as well just... Hey, there's lots of other options out there. Let's connect you with the one that's going to feel good for you. Do you want to talk about the ones that I'm seeing kind of really aligning with the summit?

Krista:
I would love to, yes.

Which personality types are great for hosting a summit

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. Surprise, surprise, not really, I definitely see ISFJs being great at this because, and here's why. Yes, you guys can't see, but the fist bumps are going on like, "Yeah. Okay. I'm on the right track." So I definitely can see ISFJs, also ESTJs and ESFJs. These are all lots of similar letters there. These are all in the sentinel tribe. I can see them really loving both the setting up of the summit and the hosting of the summit because you all are very organization, process, template, system oriented and you're very people oriented at the same time. So when it comes to hosting an event like this, you're not only the backend person able to put all the pieces together, organize it, create a process, systemize it, all of that, and you're also always thinking about not your end goal area or your end result, but more so about the person on the other side of the screen that's going to consume all of this content and enjoy the experience.

Brit Kolo:
So with those two things put together, I think that that's a pretty perfect opportunity for you. Now when it comes to the two different energies and kind of like, "Well, who would be really good at the backend stuff, but maybe not so much the hosting and who would be super good at the hosting, being kind of the face of the thing and making sure everybody's happy, but not necessarily the backend stuff?" So I can see any of our more technical, logical thinkers. I'm thinking INTJs, INTPs, ISTJs, those people more introverted, more thinking, logic based, they're going to be just fine at setting up the backend stuff. They're going to do great at that, but maybe not so excited about the hosting and the being out there, putting their face out there, being really super excited all week long.

Brit Kolo:
That's not really their jam. So if they wanted to host a summit, I would recommend to maybe do a co-hosted summit or if you're lucky enough to have a business partner that wants to do this with you and happens to be a really great host, those people I would say are ENTJs, ENFPs, ESFPs, ESFJs, those types tend to be really out there, face out there, really vibrant, will get on video, be the face, be the host of it while you can kind of like lean back and just do the backend stuff and all the techie stuff. Yeah. So that's kind of overall how I might recommend to those different people. Then for the people that I haven't necessarily... The different types I haven't really said, it's not necessarily that summits are the worst possible thing you could do, it might just not be the best. Really think about it. Really think about, "If I'm going to do this, how can I make it feel good?" And if you can't really find a way to do that, then I would just say find something else because you got a lot of other options. Right?

Krista:
Yeah. It's so not worth forcing, absolutely anything, but especially something like a summit where if you're going to do it, you're stuck in it for three months. It's totally not worth forcing something like that, but I love how you broke down the two different sides and pointed out just because you maybe don't like one part of it doesn't mean you can't do it. You just might want to find someone to help you out and that kind of led to what my next question was going to be, which was, does that mean that some of these people just aren't a good fit period or is there some things that they can do to make it work for them? You answered that question.

Krista:
A specific example I was thinking of was, I've had a couple people tell me that they could never sit down from scratch and put something together like a summit, but that they love taking my templates and timelines and resources and doing that. I think it's perfect and if it's something you really want to do and there's some part of it that just feels hard and you're feeling a lot of resistance, just find the workaround for if you truly want to do it. It's not like a hard and fast rule and I love that's what you're pointing out here.

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. That's a really good point that if the backend stuff and starting from scratch, that kind of freaks you out, but if you could just have a template. I mean, hey guys, found you one. She's right here because she's created it. So that's super, super helpful. I bet that it would be harder to find someone, like if you're good at the backend stuff to find someone to do the more hosting kind of role. I've definitely seen it work. I can think of a summit that I was just a part of that these two are total opposites and they came together to create a summit and it worked brilliantly because one was really more of the behind the scenes technology, doing the tech stuff, organizing, systemizing, and the other one was face out there, making a splash, visible. So it can totally work.

Krista:
Yeah, I love it. I actually know a couple... I know one person who loves the behind the scenes stuff. So if anyone listening wants to be the face and needs someone behind the scenes, shoot me a DM on Instagram. I can make that connection because that's such a great option that I've never thought about really pushing. But it is such a great solution for everybody. So based on what we've talked about, what is the biggest takeaway you would want listeners to get from all this?

Your biggest takeaway

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. Well, I think it goes back to the main takeaway overall. Yes, you can apply this to summits, but let's just apply it to your entire marketing strategy. This stuff has to feel good for it to work and some people... I get the pushback. I get it every day, all the time. Believe me, I get lots of objections to this idea, but only from people who haven't tried it yet. Right? The tire kickers, the people that are just kind of looking out from the outside and being like, "Yeah, that sounds really good, but that's not really how it works." Once I can challenge them enough to get them in there trying it out, they realize, "Oh, okay. So this is not just like a really good tagline, this is actually something that works. When I feel good, my audience feels good." It's simple energetics here. What you put out, you get back. When you show up feeling good, your audience is going to feel good too.

Brit Kolo:
So when you're thinking about that, as you're going through your day today, as you are going through your week or maybe planning next week and you're thinking about, "How do I get the word out this week? How do I create the strategy that will allow my business to grow?" We're right here at the beginning of the year. I'm sure you've been asking yourself these questions like ad nauseam, right? As you continue to ask those really important questions that we all have to ask of ourselves, of our businesses, of our teams, see if you can start shifting that and asking, not, "What should I do in my marketing," not, "Should I do a summit," more like, "Okay, how can I make this feel good? Because I know... that core belief, "I know that as long as I can feel good about what I'm doing, I'm going to show up in my best light and people are going to like that. That's going to be magnetic. So if I'm looking at a marketing strategy, how can I make that feel good for me?"

Brit Kolo:
Then if you have a team, this gets so much more fun, even more fun because now we can apply it to everybody but even just like looking at you, how can we make this feel good for you so you can show up in your best light. Same thing with a summit, so if hosting a summit is on your 2020 master plan list, yes, you can ask, "How should I host a summit?" Right? Cool. Plenty of answers out there. I'm sure Krista can help and you can also ask yourself the question, "How could I host a summit that would feel super good for me?" "How could I do that to allow myself to show up in my absolute best light?"

Brit Kolo:
Those are the kinds of questions that I'm encouraging more and more entrepreneurs and small business owners to ask because if we can, we tap into some magic, some magic that creates this magnetic pull toward your business and you start growing and you start scaling and you're like, "Wait a second. I'm just doing what feels natural and what feels good. Is this really... Pinch me." Yes, that's how it works guys. Yeah, that's what we're trying to do. So that's my best advice there.

Krista:
I love it so much and it is so true because when stuff starts clicking for you, it's clicking for your audience too and it's such a powerful combination. I love that that, that you pointed out. Where can people go to learn more about you and what you offer and where they can go to learn more about what kinds of marketing is going to be best for their personality type?

Brit Kolo:
Yeah. At this point, you're probably like, "Well, what is my best marketing strategy? How do I get that?" So it's super simple, everybody. MarketingPersonalities.com is my website. You go there, the homepage has all 16 of the types laid out. You click on just yours and you're going to click through some pages, learn more about where you find your flow in your work, where do you find your power in your work? Then ultimately, what your best marketing strategy includes so you can start applying that to your marketing, to your business strategy and even your summit strategy. How can we get this to feel good? And if we can do that, that's going to be a marketing strategy that works. I know that that's what we're aiming for. MarketingPersonalities.com is where you get all the goods there.

Krista:
Thank you so much for being on today, Brit. This is just fascinating and you broke it down in a way that's so easy to understand. So thank you so much.

Brit Kolo:
Thanks for having me.

Krista:
I hope you loved this episode with Brit. If personality types are newer to you, I'm guessing your mind is just blown. If it is, let me not Instagram because this stuff is so... It's so interesting when you first hear about it and can start validating the best ways you work, and your tendencies, and things like that. It's such a cool thing to start to understand. As your action step for this episode, just kind of reflect on your plan to host a summit and see how you can tweak things. Tweak my strategies if you're in the summit host vault, to creating an event that really feels best for you because like what Brit said, when your event feels good to you, it's going to feel good to everybody else as well.

Krista:
Thank you so much for tuning into this episode. In the next episode, we are going to chat with an incredible guest who is breaking down what her first summit looks like and kind of getting her thoughts that she's having right after she has wrapped up an incredible event, so be sure to tune in for that. Now go and take action to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit.

 

Resources

 

About Brit

Brit Kolo is the creator of the Marketing Personality Type™ Framework at MarketingPersonalities.com and the Host of the Marketing Personalities Podcast. Through her framework, designed to match you with your best marketing strategy based on your Myers-Briggs Personality Type, she’s here to shake up your approach to marketing and inspire you to grow your business in a feel-good way. 

 

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