Increase Summit Signups Through Your Registration Page + Email Sequences with Elli Runkles

In this episode, we have launch and conversion copywriter Elli Runkles to talk about the most important pieces of copy for your summit's registration process. We'll cover what to include on your registration page and mistakes to avoid, emails to turn your existing list into summit attendees, and the sequence that should go out once someone registers for your event.

Transcript

Hey there. Welcome to the Summit Host Hangout Podcast, where you'll learn how to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit, no influencer status necessary. I'm your host, Krista from Summit In A Box, and we're currently in a series about your summit's registration process.

Today, in episode 34, I'm so excited to bring in an incredible guest to talk about her tips for your summit's registration page and email sequences. We are going to cover common mistakes she sees on registration pages, how to get your messaging right on your registration page, which is so important, and then what to include on your registration page and in your email sequences, both the emails that go out to get your email list registered and the emails that go out once someone registers, but before your event starts.

But to give you some background on our guest, she's a copywriter and sales strategist who helps her clients harness the power of written words in order to sell in their business in a way that actually feels good and gets results. She is on a mission to empower female business owners to embrace the value they bring to their ideal clients so they can ditch the fear of being salesy and sell with ease and empathy.

You guys, she is so good at this. She is the copywriter who edits all of my summit copy, all of my other launch copy, and she's the one who edits all of the copy used inside of the templates and the Summit Host Vault. So if you have used any emails, any website pages from a Summit Host Vault, she is the reason they sound so good, and I am sure you're excited to hear from her, so without further ado, let's dive in and talk with Elli Runkles.

Krista Miller:
Welcome, Elli. I am so excited to chat with you today about all things registration copy, but before we dive into that, why don't you tell us a little bit about how you got started helping online business owners make their copy way better because I can speak from experience and saying that you really, really do?

Elli's Background

Elli Runkles:
Yeah, so I think with anything, it's kind of been an evolving journey. I started doing blog posts and doing any kind of content creation, writing stuff for clients, and then just over time, that has evolved and evolved up until what I do now, which is now purely sales and launch conversion-focused copy, and like I said, that's really been a process, but just kind of over time, working with people, writing sales pages, seeing what works and what doesn't, I've really kind of gotten an eye for... You just made this one little change, this would make your conversions like way better kind of thing, and so that is kind of where it started, and then since then, it just kind of evolved into not only writing for clients, but then doing more coaching and helping people to learn how to write copy for themselves as well.

Krista Miller:
Elli is the reason that all of the copy inside... well, for my own summits and the copy inside of the Summit Host Vault sounds good because she's the one that edits all of that, tells me what tweaks to make. She is the brain behind all the copy in there, so if you've seen something in there and you're like, "Damn, this is good," you have Elli to thank, but let's dive in and start with summit registration pages, and I just see such a wide range when it comes to these. There are some pages I go to that's basically like a landing page. There are some really long ones where I just read the copy and kind of want to bang my head on my desk, and then there are some great ones, but I would love your take on what are, first, some big mistakes you see people make with their summit's registration pages?

Mistakes to Avoid on Your Summit's Registration Page

Elli Runkles:
So I think the main thing that I see is when people go into writing their summit registration page, it's kind of a mindset thing, but when you go in thinking this is free, therefore, it's going to be easy to sell. You come at it from a place of not putting it quite as much effort and energy into it really as necessary in order to get a good registration page. It's really going to convert well, and so I think the main thing that I advise people to keep in mind and one of the mistakes I see people making is, again, thinking that you're... You're not necessarily selling, so you don't need to sell.

Elli Runkles:
But even for free things, you still need to sell them, and so I really recommend that you approach a summit registration page very, very similarly to the way you would approach a sales page for a paid product because at the end of the day, even if someone is not paying money to attend your summit or at least the free portion of your summit, they're still spending time, energy, their email address in order to come to your summit, and so it's going to be really important to make sure that you are putting just as much time and energy into making sure your registration page is good, "good," but by good, I mean it sends the right message, it shows the value of the summit, it shows people the transformation and results that they're going to get from it, and just because it's free, it doesn't mean you don't need those things.

Krista Miller:
I love the point you made about you're not necessarily convincing them to spend money, but you do need to convince them to spend their time, and that's like a big trade-off. I mean, maybe I'm not seeing that right, but it's still a big thing you need to put some effort into, and I've never thought of it that way, but I love that you brought that up, and it's something that I feel like I see a lot is even if people maybe are putting the effort in, they are getting the messaging really wrong. Like so many people are like selling the fact that it's a summit. They're like, "Oh, look at the summit. Here are the speakers," like, "Sign up," basically, and they're focusing on that fact. How can someone create messaging that converts for registration page, and what are your thoughts on focusing on the fact that it's a summit?

Messaging That Converts for Your Registration Page

Elli Runkles:
With pretty much anything that you are promoting, the modality of it. So whether it's a summit, whether it's a webinar, whether it's a PDF download, that modality is not the most important thing like that's not what people are buying. What people are buying is the results that they're getting from it, and so on your summit registration page, yes, it's a summit and yes, there are benefits that a summit has that other maybe free events or free trainings don't have.

Elli Runkles:
But at the end of the day, people are showing up because they want the result that your summit promises, and so it's so important to be clear on who the ideal client or ideal attendee for the summit is, what they're hoping to get out of it, and what they're... like what they're experiencing today that they want... Either they want a... It's a problem that they want to go away, or if it's like a design that they are really trying to find the answer to, what is that thing that they're experiencing today, and how was your summit going to help them get to that result because that's really the promise that you want to be highlighted and very clear on your registration page in order for people to say, "Oh, I don't know what this is, whether it's a summit, a webinar, whenever, but I need to be there because that's going to solve the problem that I have."

Krista Miller:
So really, someone could think of this like a course or a program sales page, or I guess a service where you're hitting on pain points, you're hitting on the benefits and the transformation, and then you're kind of presenting what your solution is after you've set the stage in that way. Does that sound right?

Elli Runkles:
Yeah, absolutely, and I think it doesn't necessarily need quite as much time and energy as you would spend on a sales page, especially a sales page for like a thousand-dollar product or something like that, but it's still a similar process. You can probably get away with a little bit less copy, so like just kind of touch on, "Okay. This is the benefit. This is what you're experiencing now. This is the result you want," and just like a few sentences. Whereas on a sales page, that might be like several paragraphs, so it doesn't need quite as much emphasis, but yeah, you can really approach it in a very similar way to a sales page.

Krista Miller:
Okay. That sounds great, so what, in your mind, goes into a registration page that actually is going to convert?

What Goes Into a Registration Page That Actually is Going to Convert

Elli Runkles:
Yeah, so I think like we've said, it's that one... like the main promise. You want that to be kind of like your above the fold, so like the first thing people see when they get on like land on your registration page. What is the promise? What is the main outcome that they're going to get after attending the summit? Then, from there, you can kind of go into some of the empathy points. This can be considered like a problem pain point. I like to call it empathy points because it sounds nicer, but basically, like what their current situation is, what they're experiencing, and what the problem is that they're trying to solve that your summit is going to get to them, and then things that are more summit-specific.

Elli Runkles:
You want to talk about like the key takeaways which this... That goes for anything, but you want to talk about the key takeaways so like, "At the end of the summit, you will X, Y, and Z." Like what are the three things they're going to walk away with? Then, in the case of a summit, you're going to want to highlight your speakers. You're going to want to talk about the topics that are going to be covered. But again, the main thing that you're going to want to pay attention to is what's the promise, what's the result, and obviously, the sign-up form. it's like don't forget that piece, right, where they put in their information and sign up for the summit, but that's... Those are the main things I would focus on.

Krista Miller:
Yeah, and I love the order you brought those up in as well because... So you said the promise, the empathy points, which I love or pain points, and then the key takeaways, and then you said the details like the speakers and topics, and I think that is something that everyone should note because the more you help people thinking of signing up, see the actual results they're going to get, the more they're going to care once they get to those specific details like the speakers, what the topics are, when it's going to be, how they sign up, things like that.

Krista Miller:
The more you've grabbed them and pulled them in through the pain points, and the benefits, and the promise, the more those things are going to matter and the more likely they're going to be to sign up rather than including all of that on the top of the page when they don't necessarily care and might not even continue scrolling to the rest of what you have to say. So I just think all those things are so important, and I love that you're bringing to light how important the things like the benefits and the pain points are because I really do think they are game-changers and a huge indicator of how well that page is going to convert.

Elli Runkles:
For sure, and one other thing too to mention on that is when talking about the order of the way things happened, just in general, a good way to think about that is they need the why, and then the how, so like they need to know why they need to be paying attention first, and then once you've caught their attention and they thought, "Oh, this is a topic I want to know about," then we can get into the house and the details of like what this particular thing, in this case, a summit, is going to bring them.

Krista Miller:
Ugh, yes. I love that, and it is so important in every step of the process I think, and that kind of brings me to wanting to transition a little bit to even getting them to that registration page in the first place and talking about the registration. Not the registration sequence. Maybe like the sequence to get them registered because in my mind, there are two different types of maybe registration-related email sequences. First is the one that actually gets them to the registration page to sign up, and then there's another sequence that should happen once they're signed up, but before the summit starts, but let's start with the emails you should be sending out to get someone to register. Can you talk a little bit about what that should look like and how to increase the chances of getting your existing email list to even care about your summit?

Increase the Chances of Your Existing Email List Caring About Your Summit

Elli Runkles:
In terms of getting people to the registration page because it's true. That's a totally different situation from getting them to the page and then kind of nurturing them into time between when they register and when the summit actually happens, but for getting them to that registration page, you're going to be talking a lot about those same benefits, empathy points, things that they're experiencing, and results that they want to get. I would say it's a good idea to have, depending on the amount of time you have, and size of your list, and things like that, I would send probably three to four emails to your existing list.

Elli Runkles:
I think with the emails you send to your list, you can kind of make them feel like part of your community like, "You're already a part of this because you're on my list, and so I want to invite you to this other thing I'm doing," to make them feel special, to make them feel like they are included in the process even of what you're doing. Maybe even asking for their input as you are working on ideas for your summit to just kind of let them know even in the early planning stages that like, "Hey, this is something that's happening," because again, for them, they're already on your list, so it's not really adding to your email list for them to show up, but it's just a way of nurturing them even more.

Elli Runkles:
So things I would focus on in that is, again, that community aspect, making them feel special and feel part of your community, benefits of the summit, benefits of why they should show up, what they're going to get out of it, and then maybe even highlighting some of the speakers because if there are names that they recognize, that might be an extra little benefit to get them to want to sign up.

Krista Miller:
I always like to use more influencer speakers to get people to sign up like in all parts of my summit copy. Something else I wanted to mention though was that you were talking about the pain points and benefits, and something I do, I guess I'm curious to get your feedback and if it's a good idea, is I'll write my sales page first, and then take pieces of that copy and use it in my emails to make sure the two are really cohesive. So if someone likes a part of an email, they're going to go to the sales page, and they're going to see that same thing they're going to... It's not going to feel disconnected. Do you think that's a good route to take?

Elli Runkles:
Yeah, absolutely. That's exactly what I do in my process. If I'm writing like a launch sequence for any kind of offer, I always start with the sales page. So in this case, it could be the registration page, and then work backwards from there as to where are we sending people, and then write emails around that to get them there.

Krista Miller:
So you have an awesome freebie about writing launch email sequences. I believe it's ellirunkles.com/free. Does that sound right?

Elli Runkles:
Yes, that's right. Yeah, and it's a guide to the seven types of emails that you want to include in your launch sequence. You don't necessarily need to use all seven right away in the same stage of your launch, but pay attention to those seven emails, and that will get, for sure get some ideas flowing for things you can send to your list to get them to sign up to your registration page.

Krista Miller:
Love it, so let's move on to the email sequence someone's going to get after they register for the summit. Talk to us about what the purpose is in your mind about or of an email sequence after someone registers.

The Purpose of an Email Sequence After Registration

Elli Runkles:
Yeah. So again, going back to that idea and that just because it's free, it doesn't mean it's easy to sell. Just because somebody signs up to your... like typed in their email address on your registration page, it doesn't necessarily mean... It almost definitely doesn't mean they're going to like stop what they're doing, go put it in their calendar, and like have it ready like just from signing up on that page that they're like, "Yes, it's in my calendar. I'm going to show up," and so we need to remind people that it's happening for one because people are busy. That's just the reality of it. Even the people who are the most engaged and the most excited about the information that you're sharing at your summit, they need those reminders in order to show up.

Elli Runkles:
One thing that I really recommend is think of this registration sequence as, "What can we do to get people excited about showing up?" So not just like, "Hey, don't forget this starts on Monday. Hey, don't forget you've got three days till the start." It's like kind of repetitive like, "Don't forget this is happening," but doing specific things to... and talking about specific things that are getting people excited so they're like, "When is this happening? I can't wait."

Krista Miller:
Ooh, I like that. Something that I saw someone do first time that I'm signed up for is give like a 48-hour window where someone could... where we could watch like one of the presentations that was going to be happening during the summit, and that's something I had never thought of before, but it's an example that came to mind when you said, "Keep them excited."

Krista Miller:
Something I like to do is have a quiz that people can take that helps them decide which presentations to go to, and I think little things like that, they really do add so much, and they're so much more impactful than just, like you said, saying, "Here's the thing, Don't forget the thing." When you're getting them engaged and getting them like... especially if they're interacting with the content you've got coming, that's just going to really increase the likelihood that on day one, they don't see your email and be like, "I don't care about this anymore," and unsubscribe. Instead, they're excited to get started.

Elli Runkles:
Yeah. I love the quiz idea. I think that's genius because it's... They get a sneak peek at not just the presentations, but these are like, "The curated presentations that I should be paying attention to," so I love that.

Krista Miller:
Yeah. Do you have any recommendations for specific types of emails that should be included in the sequence other than, "Hey, remember here's this thing?"

Specific Emails That Should Be Part of Your Sequence

Elli Runkles:
I think continuing to, again, talk about... almost reminding people of why they decided to sign up in the first place like reminding people of that promise, reminding people of what they can expect to come away from the summit with, and also, I think teasing the content. So I had never heard of that example that you just shared about making one of the presentations available early.

Elli Runkles:
I think something like that could definitely work, but also, just talking like highlighting some of the presentations and talking about the key takeaways of that specific presentation, so getting people excited about different elements of it rather than just the summit as a whole, but what are some key takeaways or specific pieces of it? Then, also, I think it's a great time to also start teasing and pre-selling whatever the paid content of your summit is as well.

Krista Miller:
Yes, yes. I totally agree with all that, and you guys, Elli helped with the registration email sequence that's inside of the Summit Host Vault. It is, I'll say myself, is pretty good, so check that out if you haven't yet.

Elli Runkles:
It's a team effort.

Krista Miller:
It was definitely a team effort. Oh, man. So we have covered so much today relating to registration pages, the different types of registration emails on both ends of the actual sign-up. What is the biggest takeaway you want someone to get today from what we've talked about?

Your Takeaway

Elli Runkles:
I think the biggest takeaway would be to treat your summit as if it were a paid offer because at the end of the day, it is. Right? At the end of the day, you have the paid offer that's going to come in later, and the more care you put into the earlier pieces, the free pieces, the better return on investment you're going to see from the paid pieces once you get to that point because even if it's free, people are still making an investment of their time, and so if you can honor that and really show them what they're going to get from that investment of their time, it's going to pay off in so many ways.

Krista Miller:
Ugh, I totally agree, and thank you so much for all this incredible information you've shared. Where can people go to learn more about you, and what you offer, and maybe how to get your help with their summit copy?

Elli Runkles:
Yeah, so my website is ellirunkles.com. I'm Elli Runkles pretty much everywhere. Instagram is where I hang out the most, so if you want to come and follow me on Instagram, send me a DM. Let me know what you thought about what we talked about today. I would love to connect with you all.

Krista Miller:
Thank you so much for tuning into this episode with Elli.

In the next episode, I'm bringing on an incredible guest to talk about her experience running summits, so be sure to tune in for that. There's always so much to learn from the experience of others, and then we're going to dive into a series on promoting your summit, and I know so many of you have questions on how to do that, but for now, go out and take action to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit.

Resources

About Elli

Elli Runkles is a copywriter + sales strategist who helps ambitious women entrepreneurs build the confidence and bank accounts to match their big vision. She helps her clients from solopreneurs to 7-figure business owners harness the power of written words in order to sell in their businesses in a way that feels good and gets results. Elli is on a mission to empower women business owners to embrace the value they bring to their ideal clients so they can ditch their fear of being salesy and sell with ease + empathy.

Launch Email Sequence Writing GuideWebsite | Instagram 

 

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