035: Evolving Your Summit Over Time with Liz Wilcox

In this episode, Liz Wilcox is taking us behind the scenes of what it has been like to host 3 summits alongside 3 co-hosts.

We're talking about everything from how the event and offer have evolved over the years to how to help an audience not familiar with online summits understand how it all works.

Transcript

Hey, Hey, welcome to the Summit Host Hangout podcast where you'll learn how to plan, strategize and launch your profitable online summit, no influencer status necessary. I'm your host, Krista from Summit In A Box, and we're in a break from our normal series format to fit in a couple of incredible guest episodes that I know you're going to love. Today, in episode 35, I'm so excited to bring in a guest to talk to us about running her third summit with a group of friends. We're going to cover the unique audience that summit is created for and how they avoid confusion with the virtual summit terminology, how the event and offer have evolved from year to year and summit to summit to keep things exciting while increasing their impact and profits and the key to four people coming together to host an incredible event without driving each other crazy.

To give you some background information on our guests, she runs an RV centric digital summit with three other genius bloggers. They just wrapped up their third year, and they've tried just about every strategy out there when it comes to online conferences including turning it into an actual real life event. She has so much experience and knowledge to share. So let's dive in and talk with Liz Wilcox. Welcome Liz. I'm so excited to have you today and hear all about your summit experience and you guys like the way she runs her summit and how it all works is just so unique and exciting and this is going to be great. So welcome.

Liz:
Thank you. Thank you. Always an ego boost. So that was lovely. Thanks. I'm so excited to be here. I love digital summits, they're a passion of mine, so I'm really excited to share.

Krista:
I am so excited to dig into your experience a little bit, but before we do, tell us a little bit about you and your business.

Liz's Background

Liz Wilcox:
I run a website called the virtual campground. It's a site for our veers and I started in about three years ago and basically I just have fun talking about RVing and my mission in life is to help our viewers day happy and humored on the road. So I share fun stories, you know, things like campfire stories. Yeah. And I also, my big thing is to run a summit with some partners that has consumed a lot of my time in the last six months. So I'm having trouble thinking about the virtual camera on right now.

Krista:
What do I even do? I've been there. Oh my goodness. So what made you decide to run that first summit?

What Made Her Host Her First Summit

Liz Wilcox:
Okay, so this is a super fun story. I started my website, like I said, about three years ago and I wanted it as a business. I didn't start it like, Oh, I have this blog and I just love RVing so much. I can't shut up about it. I'm going to start writing. That wasn't the case. I mean I do love RVing. I talk about it all day every day. I'm sitting in my RV right now. I live in it full time, but I knew I wanted the blog as a business. So about six months in, I wrote a book called Tales From the Black Tank, a Collection of Hilariously Crappy Rv Stories. And if you're not familiar with RVing, black tank is a where the sewage goes, we'll say. And so it's just a collection of funny stories about our being, you know, Instagram doesn't normally talk about, and I say I wrote it, but really I compiled it.

Liz Wilcox:
I got other friends in the RV niche that kind of wanted to, you know, break out there and do something fun and we just compiled stories and I sold it under my website and this really lit a fire in me. People bought this thing, can you believe it? $10 they paid for a collection of funny stories and I couldn't in my whole life, I never would have dreamed. Right. So I was in a mastermind with three other RV ladies and I went back to them. We had our August meeting, I released it in July. We had our August meeting and I said, you guys, people are buying this book. I can't believe it. I had a really small email list. I sold to something like 25% of them bought the book. I couldn't believe it. And I knew all these ladies, these three ladies were so much smarter than me and whatever their idea was, they could make money if they could just put it out there in the world.

Liz Wilcox:
I said, you guys, I want to do a holiday bundle, but I have a kid. I don't have time to create more products. Like I haven't even been blogging for a year. You guys should create products. We're all RVers, we all talk about RV. We can bundle them up and you know, sell them individually and split the profit. And they said, well that sounds great Liz, but we don't have products and Christmas, you know, it's the end of August here. I said, Oh, that's no problem. You guys are geniuses. I created my book in six weeks. You guys can do it too. And I think reluctantly they were like, okay, okay Liz. And they created some products. We got together with some other RV bloggers that we knew had products too, and we got back on the phone and they said, okay Liz, well now we have these things almost completed.

Liz Wilcox:
How are we going to sell this? How are we going to sell this bundle? And I had just seen someone host a digital summit that was basically before that word, you know, was like in the system, I guess, you know, I don't even think she called it a digital summit or a virtual summit, anything like that. But that's what it was. And I said, Hmm, we could do that. And so I presented it, I said, have you guys ever heard of shark week? And they said, yeah, you know, the discovery channel, they play nothing but shark stuff all week. I said, we are going to do that and it's going to be about our being. And it's going to be just like shark week where we just fill everybody's Facebook feed with all this RV and content. And then at the end of every video we're going to say, Hey, buy this bundle.

Liz Wilcox:
Isn't it great? And they were like, again, like, Oh man, that sounds terrible. I think two of them, two of my partners, they were, they said, okay, one was reluctant but saw how excited everyone was. So she hopped on board, thank God she did because she's a genius and I need her in my life. Yeah. And that, that's how it started. And we planned and implemented that first summit in three weeks.

Krista:
My goodness. How, how did all of that go? Are there a lot of bumps in the road or did it go pretty smoothly since there were so many of you working on it?

Liz Wilcox:
It was like a Christmas miracle. It went so well. I mean, from my perspective, my memory, this was two years ago guys, so I think it went really well. We actually, what was super cool about it was we planned it Monday through Friday.

Liz Wilcox:
We got these people to say yes. You know, some people said, no, we're not interested in being part of this bundle thing. That doesn't really make much sense. And some people said yes, but we kept adding things, you know, Oh, well we're going to go noon through 8:00 PM and then it was, Oh well we can sprinkle in a little more. Let's do live interviews, let's do this and that. And I remember Monday, during one of my live videos, I said something like, Friday, we've got a big surprise. It just came out. And so I get off the phone and my partner said, Liz, we have no surprise for Friday. What are you talking about? And I was like, I don't know, just, it just seemed right. We'll figure out something. And this was before I knew, you know, about bonuses and teasing content. I was, it was just all natural.

Liz Wilcox:
Me opening my big mouth. And someone contacted me who at the time I thought was like the biggest RV YouTuber that there ever lived. And they said, Oh, you know, we heard you're putting this thing together. We'd love to be a part of it. And I was like, that's going to be the surprise on Friday. And that was within 20 minutes of me saying, I've got a big surprise. And it was amazing. So for me, I think everything just fell into place so nicely. It was like the universe, God, whatever you believe in was saying like, yes, this is what you should be doing, this is how you make your Mark. And for, I would say it was successful because for me it was about proving to my friends that they can make money online. You know, if I could make money from a book about RV black tanks, you know, whatever their idea was, it was bigger and better than mine.

Liz Wilcox:
And so this was a way of saying like we're sticking around, we know we're new bloggers but Hey together we can do anything. And that was a success that first year cause that's exactly what we did. People knew who we were and that we were not messing around.

Krista:
I love how all of this just came together. I also just love the sound of how you work because it kind of sounds similar to me except like on steroids almost where you have an idea just like all right.

Liz Wilcox:
Oh yeah I just go for it. I love it.

Krista:
Okay. Back up a little bit. I should have asked this before, but well, we'll do it now. Tell us about how your summit works, like who is it and kind of have an idea of who it's for, but what's the goal around it? How do you monetize it, all that good stuff.

How Liz's Summit Works

Liz Wilcox:
Sure. So that first year, like I said, it was a bundle of products and the summit was basically a platform to sell that bundle. And you know, that worked pretty well. We didn't really know what we were doing. We sold in five days, we made like 43 sales, you know, at 100 bucks. We thought we were rich beyond rich, you know, like quit your job, buy the Porsche. Like we are done, you know, the deal is sealed. I mean that's how I felt. And we split everything evenly with anyone that participated in that year. So the next year came to the table again and we knew it was going to be bigger. You know, we had all been working, we had taken that platform and went back to our individual businesses and blogs and really kind of went from there. So the second year we had to come back and we restructured it.

Liz Wilcox:
We didn't have this bundle of products anymore, you know, we had all kind of taking it back to our own platforms and built different things. But we knew we wanted to do it again. And I had another big idea of how we were going to make money and make it different from the year before without having to pool in all these different products. And of course, by this time, this was about a year ago when we would release the second version, I thought to myself like we could sell the videos the way that these other summits that are coming out, we, you know, we can do that too. But I thought to myself, Hmm, well how else can we incentivize? And so we created a coupon book and it's kind of like what you think of when, you know, the high school cheerleading squad is selling local coupons, you know, for a fundraiser to go to finals or whatever.

Liz Wilcox:
And I said that'll be, you know, our veers as a whole, you know, there's a lot of YouTube content, there's a lot of blogs out there. And so maybe they don't see the value in the videos as much, but my God, do they love to save money and dang it, we're going to give them a way all in one place to save money. So it was really about thinking about the audience and what they really wanted. I knew what they needed, they needed the videos, but I know they want to save money and people buy what they want, right? We don't always buy what we need. And so that was our way of positioning ourselves to maximize value for our attendees. And so the second year it was structured in a way that you got the videos, but Hey, you're also getting this coupon book.

Liz Wilcox:
And that had all the speakers in it. You know, if they had a course, if they had, you know, an awesome freebie, they were willing to give away whatever, whatever, well not a freebie because it was a coupon book, but any kind of small product or large product. Also we had sponsors, they put in coupons as well. And honestly I can't remember how much it was worth. I think it was probably over $2,000 now that I think about it. But it was $47 we sold the coupon book and the videos, $47 flat rate boo-yah and we did really well with that. So this year comes around, we just finished up our summit at the beginning of November. We did it a little different. We did pricing tiers, no coupon book. That was a nightmare to put together the coupon book. Well I thought it was great. We were totally going to do it again.

Liz Wilcox:
A few people were asking, are you going to do the book? Are you going to, I said, yes. My partner said, Liz, that was a nightmare. Like great idea, bad invention. It's really hard to put together. Can we please think of something else? And honestly, at this point I was a bit out of ideas. I was a little burnt out because I had just launched a course for my personal blog. And so I said, okay, well what, what is your idea? Doesn't have to be my idea. Just has to be the best idea. And they said we're going to do pricing tiers. We saw that done in other summits and that worked out really, really well. This year. We were able to sell double the amount of tickets we sold last year with the coupon book. So I was right, they were wrong. Julie, Lindsey, Camille, if you're listening, you are right.

Liz Wilcox:
I was wrong. If I was in charge of the summit, I would still be selling the bundle of products. They, my partners are so awesome. They've really taught me, you know, what true value is and how to value yourself as a business and what you're offering. And so they were totally right. And we did pricing tiers. So this year around we did a 30 day, an annual and a lifetime. Most people bought up the 30 day pass, but we have a plan at the end of 30 days to try to upsell them to the lifetime. So this is the gift that keeps on giving. Again, Julia, Lindsay, Camille, if you're listening, thank you. So I'm really excited to see how this pans out even though the summit is over to see how sales turn out later.

Krista:
That is really exciting. I am absolutely in love with the fact that you guys have crafted your All-Access Pass. I'm saying in air quotes around what your people want and you haven't looked at all these other summits out there and taken that like cookie cutter approach you have. I mean maybe you've taken it for inspiration, but then you use that and branch out of it and come up with these better ideas and don't call yourselves to one approach. I love that.

Liz Wilcox:
Thank you for bringing that up. That's a good point because, because this is our third year, we have so much data. Luckily one of my partners, data nerd, you know, we've got to send out the survey. Don't forget the survey. What questions should we craft for it? It was amazing to take it from that first to that second year to be able to say like, our people love to save money. Let's do this coupon book. That's what they're telling us. And then the second to the third year, they're telling us we want more of these videos, you know? So they were able to see that's what they needed, right. And it was the best customer is a repeat customer. Of course, it's nice to say, Oh, we had some these thousands of people, but really we're concerned with how can we get the person who's been with us the first year, the second year, how can we get them to purchase yet again, because it's much easier to make a repeat sale than an initial sale. And so we were able to take all that data and say, okay, this is what they want. They've said they've want more videos of this, let's give them more videos of this. And that's what we did. And it worked out really well.

Krista:
Yeah. And I love how you're learning each year and applying new new stuff each year. So are there any other changes you've made throughout your three summits? Like how else has it evolved and stayed exciting for you guys?

How The Summit Evolved

Liz Wilcox:
Oh my gosh. We did an in person event this year. We did a hybrid event to toot my horn. I haven't heard anyone else do that. And this time I want to tell this story because I think it's really important when you're working with people. Like I said at the beginning of the episode, this was my idea to do the Shark Week type of thing and I was kind of pushing my partners, it doesn't matter if we only have six weeks to create a product, you can do it. And they all said yes to me. And this year the tables really turned because it was someone in one of our meetings said, well what if we did an in-person thing this year? You know, people have asked for that. You know, that was part of our survey. When are you going to do it in person? And I immediately rejected it.

Liz Wilcox:
I said, no way. I've got a kid, I'm the only one that has a child. I have a kid, my husband's in school, nine to five, there's just no way I can do it. I've thought, you know, I've already thought of that. No, I can't do it. And they said, well, you know, why don't you just think on it a little bit. We're not going to do it if you don't want to, but you know what, what would it look like if we did do it? Liz? And honestly, I had to get off the phone that day and I thought about all the times that they trusted me and you know, that really made me say yes to this idea. Even though I knew it was going to be hard. I knew I was going to have to bring my child to this event or you know, spend money to, you know, figure out childcare, et cetera.

Liz Wilcox:
But it really was the fact that they put their trust in me in the beginning. And so I said, you know what? I'm going to let go see what happens. And it was amazing. I haven't heard of anyone doing like an in-person thing as far as turning their virtual summit into something, but it was super fun and it was crazy cool to meet some of the people that two years ago watched our summit, our RVers Shark Week so to speak. Oh, the summit is called Full-Time Freedom Week by the way, because we believe in full time freedom as a lifestyle, but it was so amazing to hear the stories and see the faces, right, of the people that said, I watched you, I got so excited, I retired, quit my job, found a remote job, whatever, and I've been on the road for over a year now and you guys were a part of that.

Liz Wilcox:
That was seriously worth every little struggle nuance I had to go through to do the in person and that was also just super interesting. If you like this idea and you think you know you're going to do a summit over and over and it could evolve into that. It was super interesting for me because I was in charge of kind of all the live chats that we did throughout the virtual event. And so I didn't get to spend as much time at the in person event and it made me realize just how big of an event we had put on that, you know, and lucky that I had partners and we were all doing this together, that they could focus on the people at the event and I could focus on with my partners when I needed them on the virtual event. So it was cool. It was amazing to see the 50 or so people that came to the in person and it was amazing to also be connecting with the thousands of people online in the Facebook group, in the live chat, et cetera. That was really, really cool.

Krista:
Wow. So you did these at the same time?

Liz Wilcox:
At the same dang time.

Krista:
Holy smokes.

Liz Wilcox:
Yes. It was the exact same time. The only difference was the in person event. We hosted a wrap party the day after the virtual event ended. And I was pretty tired after afterwards. But I mean it's still settling in. That was only a couple of weeks ago. But yeah, it's amazing to think like we pulled that off. People were saying, wow, I can't believe you guys are doing this, dah, dah, dah. And it was really kind of grassroots situation as far as the in-person went. But man, it was so cool. I can't believe we did that. And you can give it, too, if your summit evolves to that, anyone can do it. We just kept it the same way we did the first year in person. I didn't mention this the first year in our, the first year we did it, we did it on Facebook and we did all Facebook lives in a Facebook event.

Liz Wilcox:
It wasn't even a Facebook group or page. It was, you know, you can create an event. And I said, Oh, Facebook has this new thing called Facebook Live and they have this new thing called Facebook events and you can go live right on the event page. And that's what we did. We just went for it. And I think this was just when Facebook was experimenting with scheduling posts and such. So sometimes we would schedule a video and it will pop off and sometimes we'd say, Oh that didn't work and we'd have to, you know, just do it. And that's the approach we took with the in person event too. Like you just, you just show up and see what happens.

Krista:
Yup. Yup. And I mean I think that is such a good lesson. I want everyone to take from all of this from the very beginning of the planning process. I mean you can consume all of the resources out there, but you never know what it's going to be like until you get started. And you just have to go in with the mindset that I'm going to come across some barriers and when I do I'm just going to keep going. And you guys are proof that it works. You can work around any barrier,

Liz Wilcox:
Right. No one watching your summit knows really when something goes wrong. I mean, unless the video literally isn't working. But the great thing about summits and going live once an hour or you know, going live with a video once an hour, et cetera, is the audience is so engaged. And what I love about this type of product and event is that it is an event. People are excited, they are engaged. It's not, I love email that's I'm the email queen, but it's not an email where you're talking one on one. People are able to talk to each other and so when those things do go wrong that are so blatantly obvious that even the attending knows they want to rally behind you. Right? Like our website went down during this event, the third year, our third year, and the website goes down like we hosted on Squarespace was, which is like crazy to begin with.

Liz Wilcox:
But Squarespace.com went down. And so our website went down for a little bit, but we wouldn't have even known unless people in the Facebook group were tagging us. Liz, Lindsay, you know, your site's not working. I'm getting this error and we were able to solve it. The solution was to just wait because it wasn't our problem, but we were able to address it and solve it very quickly because the attendees rallied around. So when you host a summit, it's a really interactive, it's really unlike anything else and people want to rally around and you know, help you pull this thing off because I think they kind of know like, wow, this is a lot of moving parts. I bet she's really working it behind her computer today. Like maybe I should tag her and let her know. So it's just a really cool, unique thing.

Krista:
Yeah, that's so true. That's exactly what I've experienced too. I'm trying to think of the exact situation. I don't remember and maybe it was just a worksheet wasn't working or a link wasn't working or something. And yeah, like you said, no one is upset or like judging that you don't know what you're doing. They just want to help you keep making progress so they can keep learning. And I also love what you said about, you feel like you know your audience. They understood what a big thing it was. Something I've been thinking the entire time we're talking is the business I run summits for my audience is all business owners. So they like know what summits are. I don't have to do a lot of education. There aren't a lot of questions around that, but your audience probably doesn't, I'm guessing. So do you have any tips for someone listening who thinks that their audience might not know what a summit is and how they can make it easier to understand?

Educating Your Audience on What a Summit Is

Liz Wilcox:
Yeah, sure. So of course RVers, they know what YouTube is, a blog, et cetera. That's what they're used to. They don't really know what a virtual summit is. Digital summit, they're not too savvy on this. It's a very business-to-consumer situation here. I think our name itself helps with this. It's called Full Time Freedom Week. And when people hear that word week at the end, they think of an event, right? Like Shark Week. Like, Oh, that's an event on Discovery Channel. I mean, literally how it came to be. And so think about how you want to name it. If your audience doesn't know what a digital summit is, maybe not call it a digital summit. We say on our webpage virtual event, watch from your computer 100% online. And of course, you know this is still a pain point.

Liz Wilcox:
Some people still don't understand and we have to say it's actually called the digital summit. It's like a conference, but it's 100% online hosted on our website. You know, I would suggest to you putting that language right there on your landing page or your front page of your website, but also think about what does your audience know that they can relate to. And so our audience knows rallies, our viewers go to rallies, they go to big events like that. And so us positioning it as an online rally, a big online event really helps people get it. It's like, Oh, you know, when you go to a rally and you have seminars, et cetera, et cetera, that is this. But you do not have to leave your dinette. And I say dinette because that's where people are watching in their RV. You know, you don't have to leave your driver's seat and you can't see right now. But I'm literally pointing to the driver's seat behind my dinette. So think about what your audience knows about events and translate that wording into online.

Krista:
So true and I think because of how we learn, a lot of people get get caught up with that and I think they have to call it a virtual summit or online summit and then it just leads to more confusion. So I love how specific you are able to get like a rally. That's not a term I'm familiar with, but it connected with your people and I just love that advice. Honestly, I just love everything about how you guys have put this summit together, that there's a team of you who are clearly good at different pieces. You've just let it evolve over time and grow. I'm curious as to what the biggest tip is you would give someone getting ready to run their first summit.

Liz's Biggest Tips for Getting Ready for Your First Summit

Liz Wilcox:
Just do it, do it and then do it again. And do it again. And if you have people you can trust, have partners because Holy crap, it can be a lot of work. And I really attest, you know, to our growth, the first year we had a thousand people, the next year we had almost 5,000 this year, over 7,000 I think the first year to the second year we grew by like 800% in profits and this year we nearly doubled our profits. Again, I could not have done that by myself and I don't think any of my partners could have done that by themselves. So if there is someone in your niche that you network with, you're comfortable with, if you think you can go there, I would go there. I would partner up with someone I just saw. I met some ladies that were in a mastermind together at a conference a couple months ago and a few weeks later I saw two of them spearheading a summit and the other two were like the keynote speakers.

Liz Wilcox:
And I was like, Oh my gosh, it's such a good idea. I'm so glad someone else thought of it. And I congratulated them and said, you know, I wouldn't be anywhere if I didn't have my partners to take this idea and make it into something bigger and better than I ever could have imagined. If you're going to go it alone, number one advice is do it and then do it again. You know, the first year it might seem like, Oh, all that effort. But once you get a system in place, it's so much easier to do it again and again and again. And you know, all those ideas you have for the first year, you can put in a file for next year or next six months, whatever the case is.

Krista:
Oh, I love it. And that was going to be my last question, but now I want to ask you one more, because you're talking about your partners and how well you work together. What do you think is the key that makes that collaboration work really well and not be more troublesome? Because I could see it going either way, right? Either it's a dream come true or, or the opposite of that. So what makes you guys work so well together

What Makes Liz's Collaboration Work So Well

Liz Wilcox:
Well, I think we've definitely had our ups and downs, but the thing that really makes us work is that we want it to work. You know, we're not afraid of conflict. We are also not afraid to take full ownership. I know some people ask, well how, how can you split profits or how do you, how do you value one person's work as equally as the other? But I think we are all, I don't know, it's like serendipity or something. We all are so good at individual things and it kind of meshes well, but we all take ownership. And for us, like I said, this was to prove to each other that we could make money online. That was the foundation and we did prove it. And so every year it's proving again and again to ourselves and to our speakers. Whenever I ask speakers, I'm like, this event was grounded in collaboration over competition.

Liz Wilcox:
We want you to succeed as much as we want ourselves to succeed. And so it's not about, you know, how much money I'm making us, the individual. It's about how much impact and of course profit can we make together. How big can we get together? And it's always been about that even through conflict, you know, we've had our fair share, but it's always been this is not about me and it's not about you. This is about proving that we can work together. Especially as women. We're for women. You don't often see that. Right? And I was telling, so I'm just going to manifest this and put it in the universe. I told them when we were at our in-person thing, I said I want the four of us in Forbes. Like this is the picture that's going in Forbes, we're going to take it right now.

Liz Wilcox:
Like the story of four women working through conflict and just serving their audience the best they can, letting each other do their own things, work in their zones of genius. And so it's always been about making that giant impact and collectively proving that you can serve and you can serve well together. And so I think that's what makes it work through, you know, all the craziness, especially we work remotely. This in person event was the first time the four of us have been together and almost two years and so that texting and things get lost in translation. It's you know this person so well business wise, but sometimes you forget to take into personal accounts like what they're going through and we are all full time RV or so sometimes at any one point we can all be in different time zones. Last year one of our partners during the event was in Thailand.

Liz Wilcox:
It's really just is we all take 100% ownership. You know I might be 25% of the partnership, but I'm taking full ownership of the event in a positive light and it's never been about individual profit or gain. It's always about how we can make the biggest footprint together such I love them.

Krista:
It's so well put that like I got goose. That was beautiful. Thank you so much for everything you shared today so freely. Where can people go to learn more about you and what you offer?

Liz Wilcox:
Sure. So if you want to check out the summit we are not live right now, but you can, if you want to get a behind the scenes how we do things, et cetera, you can check out fulltimefreedomweek.com and we have a subscribe for updates, button type of thing. I'd love for you to check out the website, see how we do things. We didn't even mention some of the, you know, aspects of the summit and if you want to check out the Liz Wilcox, yours truly, you can check out my website, thevirtualcampground.com. All the social media at. Is that what the cool kids say nowadays at me, @thevirtualcampground. And that's just if you're interested in RVing, I share, you know, fun stories and community to keep you out there on the road sane and safe.

Krista:
Love it. Thank you so much for being here Liz and sharing all this. This was great.

Thank you so much for tuning in to this episode with Liz. I hope you loved getting that behind the scenes look at her summit and I really hope you let yourself sit and think on the different pieces she said about how she makes it work. So while with a group of partners, and I think even if we do our summit by ourselves, we can still learn from her viewpoint on that. I really loved what she said about how she makes it clear for her audience. Don't get caught up in calling your summit what someone else including myself says you should, or following the strategy, someone else's doing. Make an event that will resonate with your audience and that is going to get you way better results than trying to follow someone else's approach to the team.

In the next episode we'll be chatting about getting sponsors for your summit, so be sure to tune in for that. Now go out and take action to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit. 

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About Liz

Liz Wilcox runs an RV-centric digital summit with 3 other genius bloggers. Just wrapping up its 3rd year, they've tried just about every strategy out there when it comes to online conferences. Including turning it into an actual IRL event.

The Virtual CampgroundFull-Time Freedom Week | Instagram 

 

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Free: Virtual Summit Prep Timeline

Learn how much time to set aside for planning and launching your profitable, stress-free online summit and use my calculator to set the due dates for you.