014: Strategies Behind Two Successful Summits with Eden Fried

A lot can be learned from taking a look at the experiences of other business owners. In this episode, I’m so excited to go behind the scenes with Eden Fried to talk about the two successful summits she’s hosted this year.

We’ll cover the results she’s seen, the strategies that work best for her, and the differences between her two summits like pricing structure, tech choices, and the use of sponsors. This is an action-packed episode you won’t want to miss!

Transcript

Welcome to the Summit Host Hangout podcast, where you'll learn how to plan, strategize, and launch your profitable online summit, no influencer status necessary. I'm your host, Krista, from Summit in a Box. Today, in episode 14, I'm so excited to bring in Eden Fried to talk about her experience running online summits. As of recording this, she has hosted two incredible summits that I've gotten to offer a little guidance on, be a speaker at, and watch. She's gotten great results and is so good at hosting that I just had to get her on to talk through some of her strategies and results.

In this episode with Eden we're going to cover the results she's seen from her summits, how she's gotten incredible feedback during the event, what strategies worked best, differences between her two summits, like pricing structure, her tech choices and the use of sponsors, and a whole lot more.

Krista:
To give you some background information on Eden, she is known as the digital product lady. She created a full-time income with digital products like eBooks, courses, and workshops. She is the host of the Rebel Boss Ladies podcast and the founder of Rebel Boss University, where she teaches how to create and launch a digital product in 90 days. Like I said before, she has hosted two incredible soundbites this year and I'm so excited to chat with her. So without further ado, let's dive in and talk with Eden Fried.

Krista:
Welcome, Eden. I am so excited to have you on the podcast today.

Eden:
Yeah, I'm so excited. I've been looking forward to this conversation for a while. Thanks for having me.

Krista:
Yeah, you guys, just be prepared for like a major summit nerd out session. We have way too much fun talking about this. But, Eden, before we dive into all that, why don't you tell us a little bit about you and your business and the summit that you run?

Eden:
Absolutely. Okay. If you guys don't know me, my name is Eden Fried. I am a digital product coach. I run a membership site where I teach creative women how to turn their passions into a digital product that they can sell online, something like an ebook, or a course, worksheets, templates, all that good stuff. I decided to host a virtual summit because it was one of those things on my, I don't even know, laundry list of things I wanted to do in my business that I put off for a really long time. A lot of other people were doing it. Actually, not a lot, but there were definitely other people doing summits and it looked like a lot of work and I didn't know if I had what it takes, I guess. Then one day I was driving home from a conference, feeling all kinds of inspired and ready to take action, and I decided I'm going to make it happen, I'm going to do it. So I did my first one and then a few months later I ran my second one, and here we are now, because I'm crazy. I already have done two.

Krista:
It's addicting. You get the high the first time, you're like, "Oh my gosh, that's happening again."

Eden:
Yes, it's happening. I immediately started planning the second one.

Krista:
I love it. You have two summits under your belt now. What results have you seen for your business since you have done those?

Eden:
Well, initially the biggest result is my growth in my email list. We say if you've ever done something like a JV webinar, you grow your list from something like a JV webinar because you're getting subscribers from another person's email list. But a summit is like having 25 JV webinars at once. You're getting subscribers from lots of other areas, people that you might've never met before or been introduced to before. So initially the biggest thing is just skyrocketed email list growth, and that's truly the best word to use to describe it.

Eden:
Also, increasing credibility. More people know my name, more people associate me with creating and selling digital products. So that credibility lends itself to a lot of trust and increased conversion rates for my products. Then beyond that, just more opportunities. People are seeking me out for more things. Sometimes I turn them down because they're not really relevant to me. I have a lot of people asking me how to host a summit and that's not really something that I teach and I always refer them to you, Krista.

Krista:
Thank you.

Eden:
I have people asking me about one-on-one coaching. But beyond that I built relationships with the speakers in the summit and that's created a lot of new opportunities, like being on podcasts and collaborations in the future. Overall, if I had to boil it down, those are the biggest takeaways.

Krista:
I love that you brought especially that second part or the last part up because a lot of people go into the summit thinking of, "Oh, I'm going to make a whole bunch of money. My email list is going to grow so much," but they don't think about the lasting effects. Literally, for years after, you're going to be getting these new opportunities, whether it's clients, whether it's someone approaching you for a collaboration. There are so many more people that have heard about you and because you hosted this big event, bringing all these experts together, you just have so much more credibility that it makes people want to approach you more. It's such an incredible benefit, it's so powerful.

Eden:
Yeah. I actually think that's more powerful than the money, honestly. I mean, there was a point, I'm sure we'll talk about this a little bit, where I didn't know if my second summit was going to be successful or not, or even going to make any money at all. I resolved in my head, you know what, it doesn't matter if it makes money or not because I know the power of the growth in my email list and the new connections I've made, and if those are the two things that I get from this, then that's worth it in and of itself.

Krista:
Yeah. Yes, and we're definitely going to break that down because I know you're going to have so much good stuff to share, especially comparing the two.

Krista:
First, something I have wanted to ask you about, during your summit, literally every time I got on Facebook while your summit was running, there was someone, some attendee or speaker, someone excited, going crazy in your Facebook group about how much they loved your summit. So I want to know what you think you did that contributed to that and all that excitement.

Eden:
It's funny that you bring that up because there was somebody in your Facebook group, for the summit hosts, who asked me was I doing anything to make that happen. I said, "No, not really." I wasn't going out there and sending emails saying, "Go comment on Facebook if you're having a good time and learning a lot."

Krista:
Right.

Eden:
I was just really focused on providing a great experience. That's my number one focus for hosting a summit. I bring in amazing speakers, I help enable the speakers to provide really great content, which I don't even need to do much work doing because they're all exceptional. That creates a really powerful four-day environment for people to learn and to grow and even to meet new people. They just felt inspired to share their experience and I was so grateful that they did.

Krista:
Right. Yeah, it works in our favor for so many different ways. That's something I have experienced in my summits a lot too, where people just going crazy in the Facebook group. My answer is the same as yours when people ask me, like, "I don't know, I'm just making the cool thing." I feel like that's not something I've seen in many other summits, so I wanted to ask you to see if you thought there was any magic something or other that goes into it. But really it comes down to just the experience you're creating, the people you're bringing in. I think having the niche and the topic and goal for the summit being pretty specific also helps as well, because people are getting what they came for and not just a whole bunch of general information.

Eden:
Exactly. Agree with that.

Krista:
Awesome. So let's dive in and talk about the two summits you've hosted at up until now. I know there's a lot we can compare about what worked well, what didn't, and I want to dive into some of those things. Let's start with why don't you give us an idea of how they both went. How do you feel about the way the experience and the results compare between the two summits you've run?

Eden:
I will say that I think both summits were a success. The first, it was my first time, so obviously I'm going to say it was a success no matter what, but it really was truly a success. But they were both successful in very different ways.

Eden:
My first summit, I had sponsors, the summit was three days. My second summit was four days. I had a few more speakers for my first summit than I did for my second one. So there were definitely some differences, but they were both successful in their own way. I would say my first one was mostly successful because I generated 3,300, I believe it was, new subscribers in that ... It was 3,100. 3,100 new subscribers in a three-day time period, in the promo leading up and during the summit itself. I generated $10,000 in profit from that summit as well. So those numbers just show that it was successful just by itself.

Eden:
My second summit was successful because I didn't have any sponsors, so all of the profit that I made came directly from ticket sales. After crunching the numbers, it's funny because it's almost exactly the same, I made about $10,000 in profit from the second summit. But this time none of it came from sponsors, it all came from ticket sales. So that was a huge success. I also generated about 2,800 subscribers for that summit. A little bit smaller than the first summit, probably because it was in the summer, so some people are just not really working, but it also could have been just because everybody has a different audience size so you don't really know when you're asking speakers if they're going to get tons of people are not a lot. But still, 2,800 and generating $10,000 in profit from the summit is significant, nothing to laugh about.

Eden:
Yeah, I would say that those are the key things that made each summit a success in their own way.

Krista:
Yeah. One thing you said was that the first time you had sponsors, the second time you didn't. What made you decide not to have sponsors the second time around? Or were you looking for them and just not finding them?

Eden:
Yeah, really good question. I deliberately decided not to have sponsors the second time around. Not that the experience wasn't great the first time, I knew the first time I wanted to have sponsors and I totally sought them out. I had a great sponsor that tied in super well with the summit topic itself. So it worked really well and I didn't feel sleazy about it. It totally flowed.

Eden:
But that being said, having a sponsor meant that I was catering some of my summit decisions around them, based on what they needed so that they would have a positive experience from it, instead of doing everything the way that I wanted to do it. So having a sponsor is like having a boss, and if it makes sense for you, that's amazing, but it wasn't something I wanted to do again. Not to say I won't do it again in the future, but it wasn't something ... I just wanted to try it without, to see how it would be different, and it worked out really well for me.

Eden:
I will say, and Krista, I don't know if I actually told you this before, but I did have a sponsor who wanted to work with me and I turned them down. It was a big sponsor opportunity, but they wanted my email list. 

Krista:
Oo.

Eden:
I'm not going to lie, I did think about it. I really, really thought about it. I thought how can I do it in a way that is very transparent, also very legal and very ethical, and I still just didn't feel right about it. It wasn't sitting right with me. They were also too quick to jump on the I'm ready to pay you bandwagon, I guess, which made me feel even iffier. I felt like, well, maybe there's something I'm missing here. Why are they so willing to fork over this amount of money to me? Maybe I'm not even charging enough. When I crunched the numbers and everything it didn't really make sense for me, but also it didn't make sense for my people. I'm so committed to providing a great experience and I can only control what I do with my list, can't control what other people do with it. So I wasn't willing to do that and I ultimately turned them away.

Eden:
I had no sponsors, which was my initial goal. My goal was to make the same amount of money with no sponsors, and I achieved that

Krista:
It's like mama bear mode. It's like, "No, you can't have my email list." What are the other things that sponsors want you to do? You said a sponsor's like having a boss. What are some of the other things that they're asking you to do, at least in your experience?

Eden:
It's just making sure that they are seen, which is obviously if I was sponsoring I would want the same thing. They never asked me anything that felt bad or weird, but where I might put a video of me, I put a video of them, things like that. Where I plug something of mine, they plugged their thing. That's totally okay and if it makes sense and you're promoting a product that's relevant to your summit topic, do it, go for it. But I wanted to try it without that and I found it to be very freeing.

Krista:
Yeah. Do you think you'll do it the same the next time around?

Eden:
Yeah, definitely. I mean, I'm always open to change. I'm always open to opportunities. If something appears that's a great opportunity and it feels right, like I don't feel iffy about it, I would be open to it, but I'm not going to force myself into a summit sponsorship because you know what? I just don't need the money. You know what I mean? Summits are lucrative enough, you just don't need the money to be profitable. Maybe if it was like ... My first time I didn't know it was going to be profitable, so it felt comfortable to have a sponsor. I knew that my expenses were going to be covered and that anything I made was profit. But the second time around I knew I could do it without them, so it felt good. But if something comes across my lap in the future, it makes sense and it's a good, mutually beneficial relationship, then I'm all ears.

Krista:
I love that so much. I've never used sponsors and it's a question I'm getting all the time, is how do you work with sponsors. I'm like, "I don't know, I haven't done it before." But what you're saying is kind of the way I felt about it. You've put it into much better words than I have, but you're totally right in that you don't need the income that comes from sponsors, especially if it's going to water down your own message, distract your attendees. I'm sure there are people listening who have many different takes on it, but I love hearing this point of view and it kind of cements my thoughts as well, which is probably why I love it. You telling me I'm right. But yeah, it's really great to hear that experience.

Krista:
Something else you mentioned was that you had more ticket sales this time around. So no sponsors, you made the same amount of profit. What are some things you did that you think led to more ticket sales or a higher overall level of income with those?

Eden:
Yeah, so I'll just clarify. I didn't necessarily make more ticket sales, but the ticket price was more expensive, so I did have that higher level of income from them. But that being said, the number of ticket sales was not much smaller than the last time. I think it was something like 30 fewer ticket sales, but it generated like thousands of dollars more.

Eden:
Your question was why did I do that and how did that come about. The first time I ran my summit, my goal was it's your first time, keep things simple. So I had one pricing option for the all-access pass. It was $47, there were no upgrades, nothing fancy whatsoever. It sold so easily that I knew that there was an opportunity to make it even better. That's pretty much how that came about. I wasn't really sure how to increase the price, but actually, Krista, I saw you host your summit and I know that you had a price increase as well and you shared a little bit of your results and I felt a little bit more confident in making my decision to increase the price.

Eden:
But I didn't just increase it, I added a whole bunch of stuff into the offer. In the past, my all-access pass was pretty much just the videos, lifetime access to the videos, in addition to a few other bonus stuff that I added. This time around, I invited my speakers to contribute their paid products, and I know you've done that as well, Krista, to the all-access pass, and it just inflated the value without me really needing to do much more work on my part. It also gave them a little bit more visibility as well and it helped them sell their tickets better with their affiliate link. So that worked magically. It works so well, everybody loved it. People feel unquestionable that the all-access pass was worth their money.

Eden:
To give a little bit more information on the ticket itself, I went from not complicated at all to extremely complicated. Instead of just having $47 option, I went to having two pricing options and the pricing option increased as the summit promo period went on. It started off as $67, $97 option, and that it increased by $30 increments as the promo went on. Oh, and I also had order bumps for all of that. Just to make things even more complicated, you guys. But looking at the numbers, having the option, not having too many options, just having two options, really it surprised me how many people chose the more expensive option, the more valuable option. So I definitely will be continuing that in the future. I think that really added to the revenue.

Krista:
What was the difference between your two pricing tiers?

Eden:
In terms of the numbers, it was only a $30 difference, but that $30 added in notes for every session. So people could listen to the sessions if they wanted to and take their own notes, or they could have all of my pre-written notes. Now, they weren't transcriptions. These were literal notes that we sat down and wrote, where we pulled out the high-level overviews, the main points, bolded the important concepts. It just saves people time. It's a good resource to have and if people didn't want to watch the videos, they could truly just print out the notes and study those and get some great value out of it.

Krista:
I love that. That's a big-time commitment though. Do you think you'll do that again?

Eden:
Yeah, good question. I actually was very careful with this. I made sure that it would be financially worthwhile. It was experimental. I totally didn't know if it was going to be a total waste of time comparing how many hours we put in or it was going to be successful. We did make a few thousand dollars in profit comparing the number of hours that we spent.

Krista:
Okay.

Eden:
And I was very budget-friendly with this. Honestly, I'm going to tell you guys my secret here. My sister's a college student, I paid her a little bit of money to watch some of the videos and take notes and she's good at taking notes.

Krista:
I love that.

Eden:
That's a little bit cheaper than hiring somebody who has a crazy hourly rate. I also capped my VA's hours. I didn't let her do all of them, because that would've been very expensive, and then I did some, which was good because I want to see the videos too. I want to make sure that they're good. And I don't have to pay myself an hourly rate, so it does save a little bit of mind for me. Of course, time is money, but I enjoyed it as well. So I was a little bit creative with how I spent that time.

Krista:
No, for sure. I think that it's really smart to get creative with things like that that can add a lot of value, but also a lot of work. I think it's important to get crafty when that comes about and I love that. We all need a college student sister, it sounds like.

Krista:
You also mentioned that you did an order bump. Can you tell us a little bit about what that means for anyone that doesn't know, and what your order bump was?

Eden:
Yeah. Basically, if you guys have ever looked at a checkout form, you're already in the process of buying something so you're on the checkout form, putting in your credit card information, there's that flashing box that says, "Wait, you can add this for just X amount of money." That's what an order bump is. You're already buying something, but they're bumping your order up with just a little bit of something sweeter, something to sweeten the deal a little bit more, without adding too much to the price.

Eden:
I had an order bump for I believe it was $19. My order bump was access to all of the previous summit's videos, so it added no work for me. Basically, if somebody were to add the order bump for $19 they're going to get not only this summit, but they're also going to get the last summit as well.

Eden:
I don't have the number right in front of me, but most people opted for that order bump. Mostly because I also showed the value of just those videos was about a thousand dollars and you were getting it for $19. I think that's really important when you're creating an order bump, in that little tiny box, you don't have a lot of room where characters, but as long as you show here's the value, here's how much it costs you to get it right now, then people will be able to justify that cost in their head.

Krista:
Oh, I love that. Okay, so I'm sure that's going to lead people to tech questions. I would love to know what you use for hosting your summit. I think you use a mixture of maybe ThriveCart and WordPress, for the most recent one at least. I'd love for you to walk us through your thoughts on that combination and how they work well together.

Eden:
Okay, yeah. The first summit, I used ClickFunnels, and if you're interested in hearing more about that I'm happy to talk about it. I wasn't the biggest fan. But for this summit, I moved over to ThriveCart and WordPress, and I used Thrive Themes on my WordPress site, if anyone's interested in how the actual pages came about. But I love the combination of using ThriveCart and WordPress.

Eden:
Number one, I already have WordPress. I think it's important that when you're analyzing what tools to use that you ask yourself, "What do I already have? What am I already good at?" Instead of having to learn a new tool on top of learning how to host a summit. That's a lot of stuff that you need to wrestle with, and I had done that. I hosted a summit and used a new tool the first time around. It wasn't super fun for me, so I went back to the basics in the technology aspect of things and used WordPress. Loved it.

Eden:
ThriveCart, you guys, if you're not familiar with it, it's an amazing shopping cart tool. Unlike other tools, like SamCart, which I would say is one of its biggest competitors, SamCart or other tools like that, you have to pay a monthly fee. ThriveCart, you pay a one time fee and you never ever pay again. You're not paying processing fees to ThriveCart. You're not paying a $99 or even $199 monthly fee. You pay one time. It is a little bit expensive, but if you think about it in terms of you're not paying a monthly fee, it's hardly any money at all. Because especially with the summit, you're making all of that back really quickly. I believe I paid $597 for ThriveCart. I know that they do change their pricing around a little bit, so if you guys are in the market for that, be sure to go look at what they're currently offering at, but it's usually somewhere around there. Then that's it, never pay again.

Eden:
ThriveCart was great because it has all the functionality for everything that you need. I was able to have two different pricing tier options. I was able to have the order bumps. I was able to have affiliates that would earn a commission, no matter whether somebody bought the lower price one or the higher price one, they would even earn a commission on the order of bumps. Everything was just perfectly tied for that, it all just worked together really, really well. I didn't have to worry about affiliate links tracking, everything is seamless. Sometimes trusting in the technology is a huge thing, because if you're using a tool that you have to really wrestle with, that's going to take a lot of time and energy from you, which time is money.

Eden:
WordPress, I mean, WordPress is WordPress, right? I used it to build the pages, and ThriveCart and WordPress work really well together, there's not even any integration that you need to do. So I'm really happy with that. I would say I'm very comfortable building webpages, so I was able to build my funnel on WordPress. Truly, immediately after my first summit, which I hosted in ClickFunnels, I recreated every page in WordPress and people didn't even notice the difference. It looks pretty identical. I'm patting myself on my back because I would say it looks really, really close to what it looked like in ClickFunnels. I liked the slick, easy design of ClickFunnels, so I just translated over to WordPress and called it a day.

Krista:
Yeah, the only reason I knew you switched is because I don't know if you told me or you posted in the Facebook group or something like that. I totally wouldn't have been able to tell either, and you know I was stalking everything.

Eden:
Yeah. I know. I'll just say this about ClickFunnels. It's great for people who don't have the patience for WordPress, but it's got a lot of restrictions. I did mention this in your Facebook group, Krista, but one of the biggest restrictions that ClickFunnels has is that it's not compatible with PayPal. In this summit, using ThriveCart, I was able to integrate with PayPal and Stripe.

Eden:
Now, I had heard this in the past, where people say if you offer a Stripe and PayPal your conversion rates go up, but I'd never actually tested it because I had always had that option. But when I used ClickFunnels, no PayPal option. I don't know if it would have increased my profit last time or not, it's hard to speculate in that regard, but I do know that I had a huge percentage of people. In fact, I have it right here. 44% of my customers chose Stripe, 56% went with PayPal. That just goes to show, the majority chose PayPal. Using a tool in the past that didn't use PayPal, I'm always going to wonder, did I lose anyone by not having that option?

Krista:
Yeah. Oh, that comparison is so great to know. I mean, yeah, for people listening, if WordPress terrifies you, that might not be the route you want to take. But I think ThriveCart and WordPress sound perfect. I've always done my entire summit on WordPress, but I might have to experiment in the future. Just because it looks so slick and it is that one-time fee, like you mentioned. It does feel like nothing when you're used to paying crazy monthly rates for stuff.

Eden:
Yeah, and I use it for everything else in my business now too. It's increased conversion rates on my trip wires and other things like that. So it's been really, really great. I'll say, also with ClickFunnels, I ended up using their email delivery service and didn't like it. It added more work for me in the end, having to move all those people and re-tag them over to the tool that I actually use on a regular basis, which is ConvertKit. So this time around I used ThriveCart, WordPress, ConvertKit and it was perfect.

Krista:
I love that line up. Awesome. I want to change gears just a little bit, because I saw you mention, maybe it was in the Facebook group, maybe it was in the questionnaire you filled out before our interview, but you talked about you went an extra step to help make sure your speakers got good results this time around. Can you tell us a little bit about what you did to help with that?

Eden:
Yeah. One of the things that I really, really believe in as a speaker is that you might not be getting paid for your time as a speaker in something like a summit or maybe even an in-person conference, but that doesn't mean that you can't leverage the opportunity to pay yourself in a little bit of a different way. That could be through using your affiliate link to promote this summit, but it also can be through what you set up in the backend of your website.

Eden:
I encouraged all of my speakers to set up what's called a tripwire. Essentially, a tripwire is a low-cost digital product, obviously I'm a digital product person, so I'm going to talk about digital products, but it's a low-cost digital product that is offered to your new subscribers instantly when they sign up for your email list, for a very limited window of time at a very discounted rate.

Eden:
Let's say you normally sell this product on your website for $47, as a tripwire, for maybe 15 minutes only they could grab it for $9 or $12. I encouraged all of my speakers to connect their lead magnet that they were promoting in the summit to a tripwire so that any new leads that came in through the summit would have the opportunity to purchase that tripwire.

Eden:
So now I had speakers who were generating income from their affiliate link promoting the summit, but also through the tripwire, and then some of them, even if they had stores or other low-cost digital products just from the new traffic they were getting were also making sales from that. So I had people making thousands of dollars just from promoting their lead magnet at the summit.

Krista:
Love that. I'm always seeing people out there saying that summits aren't a good thing. They're not a good thing to host, they're not a good thing to be part of. Blah blah blah. I can get on my soap box, I won't, but I love that you included this piece in it because that's such a great thing to also include in your pitches. If there's any speakers worried about what they'll get out of it, you have that to say and now these results to share with them next time. I think that's such a great thing to do. Did you have anything for them that helped them figure out how to do that? Or did most of them know what a tripwire was and how to use it?

Eden:
I think because of the nature of my content, I was hosting a digital product summit, a lot of them were already familiar with tripwires and many of them had already planned to use it, but I did include links to learn more about setting it up, if there was a situation that someone had never done it before or maybe you wanted to set theirs up better. I sent them over to my resource, my instant customer guide that basically teaches people how to set up a tripwire and what it could look like and the different tools that you can use if you wanted to. That's a free resource if you guys are interested in learning how to do that as well, you can grab that free guide on my website and I'll share that link with you at the end. But I sent that resource, but I do think that because this was a digital product summit that most of them had already known.

Krista:
Yeah. Awesome. I love that. Let's wrap this up. I feel like we could go on forever.

Eden:
Yeah.

Krista:
But let's wrap it up, and I would love to hear what the biggest piece of advice is that you would like to share with anyone preparing to launch their first summit.

Eden:
I would say don't be afraid to fail with your summit, and take risks because you always have an opportunity to do it again. This is coming from somebody who ran two in less than six months time, or maybe it was seven months, something like that. It might seem daunting to have to create something so expensive as a summit and not know if it's going to be successful or not, know if the idea for the summit that you have or some creative elements that you have are going to be a success, but you always have an opportunity to do it again. You'll have new speakers, you'll have a new audience, there won't be a lot of overlap, so it's okay to be experimental.

Eden:
I learned a lot from ... My first summit was a success, but I would say that there were elements that were "failures", I guess, that I learned from. I had criticism that my first summit was too packed, so I added a day the next time. I made it four days instead of three. I experimented with having sponsors and not having sponsors. Just be experimental, don't worry about failure. You can always try again next time.

Krista:
I love that so much. Where can our listeners go to learn more about you and what you have to offer, including that freebie you mentioned?

Eden:
Yeah. My website is edenfried.com. You can go to edenfried.com/instant-customer to get that guide that's going to teach you how to set up a tripwire that turns your leads into instant customers pretty quickly.

Eden:
I also have a podcast, the Rebel Boss Ladies podcast. Krista has been on there a few times, talking about nothing other than virtual summits, which is always fun. We have some cool episodes there. I break down my first summit and Krista and I talk about our mutual summit experience. I'll probably have another one breaking down this next summit as well sometime in the future. But Rebel Boss Ladies is on my website, edenfried.com/podcast, or any podcasting app.

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How incredible was that interview with Eden? I feel like there are so many things we can all take away with this. I love that she puts such an emphasis on giving yourself the freedom to experiment with your summits. I think so many summit hosts, especially first time summit hosts, put a lot of pressure on themselves to do everything perfectly the first time and get these crazy big results. When you give yourself the freedom to experiment, it just opens up so many doors and ways you can find different things that will work that maybe you haven't heard other people talk about.

I hope you took a lot of incredible notes and are ready to put them in place in your summit. Thank you so much for tuning in.

About Eden

 Eden Fried is the "digital product lady!" After bailing on her plan to attend law school back in 2016 (despite paying her seat deposit, securing an apartment, dropping thousands on textbooks), Eden decided to try her hand at entrepreneurship instead. Since then, Eden mastered the art of making a full time income with digital products (things like ebooks, courses, workshops, etc.) She's the host of the Rebel Boss Ladies podcast and the founder of Rebel Boss University, a membership community where she teaches rebels how to create and launch a digital product within 90 days. When Eden's not at work, she can be found at the gym throwing around some moderately heavy weights (emphasis on the word moderately) or rewatching an episode of Friends or How I Met your Mother for the millionth time.

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