022: Creating Transformations Through Summit Presentations with Jessica Rasdall

Your summit presentations might be full of great information and actionable, but do they create transformations?

In this episode featuring Jessica Rasdall, of the Creative Speakers Podcast, we go over just how transformational your presentations can be - both as a host and as a presenter.

We'll cover tips specifically for summit speakers, including how to choose the right speaking topic, how to make sure your business benefits, and the most important tweak you can make to create a transformation for your audience.

Then, we'll move into tips for summit hosts including how to find the right summit speakers and make sure they see a return for their hard work!

Transcript

Welcome to the Summit Host Hangout podcast where you'll learn how to plan, strategize and launch your profitable online summit, no influencer status necessary. I'm your host, Krista from Summit In A Box, and today we're wrapping up our series on your summit speakers. Now, this doesn't mean we'll never talk about speakers again, so keep the questions coming. But after today, we are going to have one episode about summit accessibility and then move into a short series about mindset blocks around being a summit host.

Today in episode 22 I am so excited to bring in an absolutely incredible guest to talk about how to get the most out of speaking at a summit, and how you as a host can help your speakers get a great return from your event. First, we're going to cover a few things for those of you looking to do some more speaking, including, how to choose the right speaking topic for your business, what to do if you were pitched for a topic or event that isn't the right fit, and how to make sure your business benefits from speaking at a summit. And then we'll move into some information for how you as a host can ensure your speakers benefit, including, how to find the right speakers, how to make sure your speakers get a return, and a couple short sentences you can include in your speaker onboarding material that will make such a difference. And I cannot wait for you to hear all of this good stuff.

To give you some background information on our incredible guest, she's a motivational speaker, bestselling author, public speaking strategist, and host of The Creative Speaker podcast. She partners with small business owners to craft stories and presentations that connect with their audience and convert from the stage. She's been featured on ABC's 2020, Katie Couric, The Guardian, MTV, Netflix, and more. And I know you are more than ready to dive in. So without further ado, let's chat with Jessica Rasdall.

Jessica's Background

Krista:
Jessica, I am so excited to have you here and talk about all the good stuff you have coming. Making sure my speakers have a good experience is something I've always been so passionate about, and I'm just pumped to have the speaker expert with us here today. But before we dive into all that good stuff, why don't you tell us just a little bit about your background maybe in business, and how you ended up being the go-to expert for small business owners who want to leverage speaking?

Jessica:
My story is crazy. It is not the normal story that most people have where they were unhappy in their corporate job, and they wanted freedom, so they started working on the side, not at all. I've been doing the same thing for almost 14 years now, and that's speaking. I was a freshman in college with all the hopes and dreams for my future, and I've always had that entrepreneurial bug though. I always, growing up as a kid, slam bracelets on the playground or anything, but I've always like business was something I was always very focused on. Both of my parents were in business my whole life, not entrepreneurs, but business was just a part of our life. So I figured I would do the traditional thing, go to college, I'd get a degree, I'd probably get a master's and sit in some fancy office for the rest of my life.

Jessica:
Until one Friday night, my freshman year of college, I went out with my best friend. We ended up drinking, and I drove us home, but we never made it home that night, and one mile from her dorm room there was a car accident, and my best friend was killed on impact. In an instant, everything that I'd planned for my future, all of my hopes and dreams were gone, and I was fighting for my own life, trying to deal with the loss of my best friend, cope with the fact that all of this blood was on my hands, and there was absolutely nothing I could do to change it. But there was something in me that just couldn't understand why I made it out of the car and she didn't.

Jessica:
And I had just graduated from high school the year before, and prom time was coming up for this new group of seniors. I had no idea why or what compelled me to do this, but I reached out to the school I just graduated from, and I asked if I could come talk to them before their prom. Had no idea what I was going to say, but something in me was just convinced that if I could share with them my story, then maybe somebody wouldn't repeat the mistakes that we had made. And he let me, and I came, and nobody got in trouble that year. We received so many phone calls from parents whose kids had been arguing with them for weeks about going out after prom, and they decided to stay home, and it just lit a fire in me that maybe this was the reason I made it out of the car. Maybe I was supposed to keep sharing this story.

Jessica:
The craziest part of it all is at this time getting up on the stage and telling everybody what I had done, I was being charged with DUI manslaughter and facing 10 and a half to 15 years in prison. The last thing somebody is going to recommend you to do is get up on a stage and share what you did. But there was no stopping me. This was my life's mission, and I was going to do it, and in two and a half years, I spoke to over 15,000 people. I was like a force on a mission until one day I just couldn't do it. I was like, I'm done. I begged my judge to sentence me. I said, "I can't wake up one more day not knowing what's going to happen, and I need to close this door. I need to be able to continue knowing that this part is done so I can have a new chapter."

Jessica:
Spoiler alert, I was sentenced to four years in prison, where four years of my life where all my friends were in college, and starting families, and I was not. I was in a very different situation. And when you come home from that, and you're trying to rebuild the pieces, we want so bad to force things back together. When something breaks or something's not working, we just want to make it go back to the way it used to be. And the reality is we can't do that. It's never going to be the same. We've been changed, everything has been changed. And I didn't want to talk about this anymore. I didn't want to be the girl in the accident. And I felt like Jessica had just gotten lost through it all. But I needed it. I needed to talk about this. This was my purpose, and I really couldn't find meaning in keep going in life, really, to be frank, if I wasn't doing something to make it right.

Jessica:
But my story had changed. I was no longer the girl waiting to go to prison, I was now the woman who had made it out the other side. And I had a different story to share. And that forced me to rewrite this story and take ownership of it in a way that could still serve others, but protect my heart. As I started getting into this world, I realized that this was something that business owners really struggled with. In today's world where we need to show up all the time, and be personable, and get on Instagram, and be this personal brand within our business. There's so much pressure to be vulnerable without airing your dirty laundry. And I felt like I just saw so many business owners really struggling with this.

Jessica:
I started in my consulting days with sharing stories. How could I help business owners share their stories in a compelling way that would still keep them credible but make deep connections? And it was through that work that I realized I was missing something. We're just too close to the work that we do to realize what's important to other people. And at this point, I had been speaking for a decade and didn't think that anybody could possibly need help with that until I went to my first creative conference, and I was speaking, and I had never been at an entrepreneurial event with speakers before, and I was so used to the professional speaking world, to realize that there were so many incredibly talented business owners who had no idea how to translate their message to the stage.

Jessica:
Selfishly, I wanted to learn a lot at this event. I wanted the speakers to do a good job, I wanted to learn stuff. So I volunteered to help the speakers craft their thoughts, and it was incredible. The feedback, realizing that I started to see that maybe a lot of events in our industry were not delivering value, and it was more of a brag fest, and I wanted to change that. So I started helping business owners take those messages, and take that content they were creating in their business, and translate it over to the stage, so that they could inspire their audience, make a difference, create a transformation, and still grow their business behind the scenes. That was a lot.

Krista:
You clearly do such a good job at it. And I feel like your story that you just started us off with is the best example of what you do that you could have given. Everybody go back and re listen and just see how she did that. We know so much about her. We can appreciate her journey, but we can also see why she's the expert, and why we should and can trust her. I'm just so thankful you're on here sharing this knowledge. I started laughing when you said that you didn't think anyone could possibly need help with this, because we all need help with this.

Jessica:
In my mind, we play this small game of who am I to do that? And oh, there's nothing they could gain from me. When in reality we're all experts at our craft.

Krista:
Yeah. Exactly.

Jessica:
We do not give ourselves enough credit.

Krista:
Isn't that the truth? And I mean that's why I'm so excited to have you on because your expertise is not only going to help all of our listeners who are interested in leveraging speaking, but also all of our summit hosts who want to make sure the events they're hosting are actually benefiting their speakers. So I want to kind of cover both sides today. But since we've never covered anything for speakers on the podcast, I'd love to start with that side of it, and then move into things that the summit hosts themselves should know. Does that sound good?

Jessica:
Sounds great. Cause I have a feeling some of these summit hosts are doing both.

How Do You Choose a Topic to Speak on

Krista:
Oh yes, I definitely think so. To start something both speakers and event hosts, I guess, need to pay attention to is the fact that the topic they speak on is actually a topic that's going to benefit them. And I know I've been really tempted in the past to say yes to speaking at summits or doing like guest expert trainings for programs for someone on a topic that wasn't going to do a thing for my business really. My first question to you is how do you choose a topic to speak on that will actually move the needle forward in your business?

Jessica:
I am obsessed with this. This is probably the most important piece of the whole equation for anybody. One of the biggest reasons there is frustration for speakers or organizers in any capacity is mismanaged expectations. And if we cannot get crystal clear from the very beginning of what's going to be best for everyone, we can't get on the same page, and somebody's going to lose, and I don't want anybody to lose. When you're looking at your business, I want you to really first get clear on why is it that you want to speak, or why do you want to be on this podcast, or why do you want to do this collaboration. What is the reason behind this? Because there should be one of two things. You are either doing this because you want to build credibility. Maybe you are planning in the next year to create a digital product, or launch a podcast, or you have a new offering that you really want to make sure people think of you as the go-to expert. That's would be like your tier one speaking. Your goal is to build credibility.

Jessica:
If you fall into the second category, which is my favorite, this is about conversions. Where in your business you have products, and services, and offerings where you want people to come into, you want to make conversions during your presentation. That would be tier two. The first thing we have to do is figure out why are we doing this? Is it to build credibility or is it to get conversions? It can be a mix of both. Totally okay. Because if it's to build credibility, you don't have to stress too much about the audience you're getting in front of, but it's that topic, right? We need to make sure that people see you as the go-to expert on your specific topic. You can't deviate on the topic. If you're a graphic designer, and you want people to know that you are the best graphic designer, and an organizer comes to you and is like, "Jess, I love your Instagram. Can you give a presentation about Instagram for us?" You're going to have to politely decline. It's not going to move your business and you're probably not the best person to do that.

Jessica:
What I would love for you to do is to turn around and tell the organizer, "I so appreciate you that you love my Instagram account, but I'm just not qualified to talk about that. Here's something that I'm really good at. Does that still fit your lineup?" And if it does, awesome you didn't lose the speaking opportunity. And if it doesn't, make a recommendation for somebody else who does fill that role. Because when we're able to step down and recommend somebody else, we are serving that organizer very well. Now they're not stressed out about how they're going to fill this spot. And we're also like politely nudging them to pick people who are experts at their craft, and not just anybody. Don't be afraid to make that recommendation.

Jessica:
If you fall into tier two where you want to make conversions, I'm going to be honest with you, the topic is not as important as much as it is the people you're speaking in front of. If your goal is to move people back into your business, maybe you're looking for new clients that you can do graphic design for, and you work specifically with realtors. I don't know why I'm picking these ridiculous examples that I've not going to have ideas for. Well, it's realtors very specifically, and your graphic designer friend who you're in a mastermind with comes to you and is like, "Oh my goodness, Jess, I would love to have you come talk about graphic design to my group of creative entrepreneurs." And you're like, it's not my people. I'm not going to make any money on this because I work with realtors exclusively. Again, it's time for you to either do it as a favor, but don't expect the conversions or politefully decline.

Jessica:
When you're looking for conversions, we obviously want to speak on topics that directly connect to your offer, but you can make some adjustments within your talk to tailor a topic to fit your offering. But if you're not in front of the right people, it's going to fall flat. So even if I want to move people back into graphic design work, and the topic is about communications or something like this, we can still breadcrumb in how visuals play a role in that, right? You could still make that conversion, but if you're talking to the wrong audience, it's not going to happen.

Krista:
I've never thought of that before. How the different goals will decide what matters most, whether it's the audience or the topic. Because I've definitely been, I guess guilty I'll say, in the passive thinking, I need both. So I actually really liked that you kind of open it up a little bit for us, but still give us that specific spot to focus.

Jessica:
It is, it's hard to kind of figure out what's the best thing for you to say yes and no to. And ideally in a perfect world, I would love for you to have your signature topics that are perfectly crafted, and they go back to your offers, but when you're in that bind and you're trying to decide if it's the right fit for you, those are your go to. And if you have no idea what your topic should be, I've got a super easy exercise for that. I basically want you to take all of your offerings, and if we can't connect a dot, we shouldn't talk about it, basically. You can do the workbook, it's at the thepublicspeakingstrategist.com/speakingtopics. It'll walk you through the exact exercise I do with my clients because I know that when you sit down and you're like, okay, I'm going to speak, what am I going to talk about? It's very overwhelming, and it could quickly feel like in all his years of experience I can talk about anything, that should help you find your sweet spot.

Krista:
Yeah, I'll link to that in the show notes for all you guys because I'm sure it's incredible. I want to check it out right now to be honest. Well, okay, let's say we got pitched for a great topic. We've been selected to speak. It's a good fit. Now what? In the past I've let interviews go live, and just hoped something good would come of it. How can people make sure that they're actually making this speech work for their business? What can they do maybe within their speech or afterwards? What are some important tips?

How to Make the Most of Your Presentation

Jessica:
I love this. Before you ever go to do the interview, to record your video, to get on a stage, it doesn't matter, I need you to think about what's going to happen after your talk. You're not in the business of talking at people, you're in the business of delivering transformations. This could be in a business, in somebody's personal life, in their finances, it can be anything. Whatever it is that you do, you are there to help the audience have a transformation. And if you stop that transformation when your talk is done, they're probably not going to get a good result, right? They're just receiving your information. What needs to happen after your talk in order for them to get a result? I want you to really sit with that and say, okay, if I'm going to help people live a more healthy life, and the first step within my teaching points is to help them clean up their pantry, then maybe it would make sense for me to challenge them to go do that right away. What's something that somebody should go do when the talk is done.

Jessica:
Once you have figured that out, we obviously want to create a free resource for them that they can download. That way you can get their email address, you can hold them accountable, you can start nurturing them through this and make sure they are getting that transformation, but also so that you on the back end can grow your email list, and make your money because this isn't free. But you can't do any of that if you haven't thought about the transformation as a whole. Because then what happens is you're just like, oh cool, I've got a freebie. I'll slap that up there at the end, and I'm sure they're going to download it. And it's not going to connect at all. They will have no reason to go download this, and they don't want to give you their email because this just feels weird and disconnected.

Jessica:
Now in order for them to actually say yes to your offer, whether it's free or paid, there's a few things you have to do during the talk in order to get them there. When we need to explain why you're the person to talk about this. Remember how I did that in the beginning. I need you to do that. We also need to show them why this is something they should actually care about. If we're telling them that it's time to get healthy, I like cookies, like what do you, why? Why should I care? What difference is this going to make for me? We have to remember that we're all a little bit selfish. Play into that for your audience and help them see how it's going to benefit them. The third thing that's really important and unless you're one of my students, you're probably not doing that this, is we have to overcome their objections before we teach them anything. Write it down.

Jessica:
Not everybody in your audience is going to receive your teaching points if they still have a block up about it. What's going to happen is they're going to get to the end and they might be like, oh wait something something, and that sounded good, but I missed all of it because I was too zoned out. If we're telling somebody that they need to create video for their business, but they have a block, that video is too hard or it's not for them or they don't have time for it, they're not going to listen to any of your content about how to implement this. We have to overcome that before your teaching point. And if you haven't shown them why you're the person to trust, why this topic matters to them, and overcoming any other objections, you're probably not even going to get them to the point where they feel like your content is valuable.

Krista:
There were some things that really, really stuck out with me. First was your point of basically start with the end in mind. Don't even start outlining your talk until you figure out what the end transformation and goal is. And that's like, yeah, I'm sure to you it's like, well duh, but to me I was like, oh that makes sense.

Jessica:
It's actually not. I'll let you know this, I didn't realize this for a while. I've always started, I've written over a hundred presentations. You've probably heard one of my talks, not by me, but one of my clients. I've been writing talks for so long, and I've always started with the message of, what's the one thing we need to get through to our audience? Because everything should be built around that. But in the last two years, I've really, really gone deeper on this conversion piece. And I've watched the analytics with my clients because I'm a nerd, and I've studied what's worked and what hasn't, and I find that it saves so much time in the speech writing process, if we start with where do I want to move them to, what I want to happen for them, it like cuts the speech writing process in half.

Krista:
Yeah. I mean I can totally see it. You don't have to draft something out and be like, oh wait, now what? Which is what I would do. Instead you have it-

Jessica:
Kind of like trying to shove the square in the circle peg at the end to get them through.

Krista:
Start swiping slides around. Yeah. Oh my gosh. Yeah. And then something else you said that I just can't get over is don't stop the transformation when your talk is done. And I feel like that gives so much more guidance on what to offer at the end. It makes that offer, whether it's a freebie or not, so much easier to think of because you can, okay, what do I want them to do after that? How can I keep them taking action? And that just makes it so much more clear.

Jessica:
And for your clients, you think most of you probably are not offering something paid at the end of your talk, right? It's probably frowned upon in whatever outlet you're in. But if you could help somebody get a quick win, they're much more likely to come back for your paid offer that you're going to offer them maybe in that next email or two. I would highly advise, don't skimp on that opt-in. I know it's so tempting to just be like, what do I already have done? What can I slap up there? And your presentation, again, is about a transformation and we're just going to keep that sucker going.

Krista:
And I feel like as summit hosts, then we have a responsibility to make that possible for our speakers. Let's shift into that a little bit. My hope is that after people have heard, like Summit Host Listening, I've heard what we just talked about, they are even more dedicated to ensuring their speakers benefit because when their speakers benefit, their audience is going to. They're not only going to get a transformation, and a little shot of feel good during the presentation, but it can continue on, and be looped back in with that summit. Do you have any tips, I know you do, on finding the right speakers for a summit that are going to, I don't know, make all this possible, and then make it easier to line up things well for the speakers down the road?

How to Find the Right Speakers

Jessica:
No, I know, we were actually just in my membership the other day talking about summits. Somebody had asked a question about it, and I was like, "Well the only person I know who does as well is Krista, so just go follow her and see how she does summits."

Krista:
Well thank you!

Jessica:
But you said something, we recorded an interview for my podcast, and you said something on there that I was just floored. I thought it was so smart. So I'm going to repeat back what you said and then elaborate on it.

Krista:
Okay.

Jessica:
You talked about how when we're looking for speakers, we, obviously it's tempting to be like who's the person with a big following? Who's got the big email list? And you said, "I need to look for speakers who have a very similar audience to mine so that we can extend that reach." And I feel like that's the part people forget about is when you're creating your summit, your conference, anything, a podcast, you need to have an audience in mind. And if the goal isn't to serve that, one of the goals, if one of the goals isn't to serve that audience, we're going to miss the mark. I say always start with who's the audience, who is it that this is for, what is the reason that they would join this thing? Because if there's not a clear reason, it gets muddy, and nobody's going to be conditioned to take action. And if we're telling them they're going to go through this summit to learn something specific. When there is more of a focus on the training, we're preconditioning them to get a result and to want to take action.

Jessica:
Get super clear on who the audience is, what we want them to get from it, really why would somebody join into this. Then I say from that point, most important thing is to think about, again, I go back to the transformation. When that person is coming to our summit, what is their before state? Where are they at right now in their life and business? What do things look like? And where do we want them to be at the end? How do we want them to feel? What should they be able to know, do, understand, achieve? And then from there, you have a clear path where plots need to be pointed in between. In order to get from that beginning to the end, what do they need to learn along the way? That's going to give you crystal clear topics that need to be covered. And then from there we say, okay, who's the best person to speak about this topic? Because that's going to get you a transformation. And rather than just going like, who are my buddies who will do this for free? You're just going to get watered down content. I say figure out the transformation you want to happen, what do they have to learn in order for that to actually take place, and then find people who are going to be the experts on those topics.

Krista:
That is so much more powerful than what you said, and that's exactly what most people do, and that's what I did for my first time. Who's going to say yes? Who do I know?

Jessica:
Because it's the least scary part?

Krista:
Yeah right.

Jessica:
It is what it is. We all do it.

Krista:
Yeah. It makes it a lot easier to tackle getting started with your pitches, but it's so much more worthwhile for absolutely everyone involved, you, your attendees, your speakers, if you do exactly that, and first craft topics that will help the attendees with their transformation, and then pick your speakers based on that. That's incredible. You have a freebie all about finding speakers too, right?

Jessica:
No. It's a workbook. Exactly that. It's going to have you go through that whole exercise and figure out the transformation. And then we also, the hardest part is to figure out that beginning part of what is it that I'm going to cover, because I can't create that for you. That's your vision. You've got to tell me what the vision is. You need to figure out what you want to see happen, like in an ideal world, nothing is too crazy, don't worry, you can find the speakers. That's later. That's easy. There are more than enough people out there, trust me. And at the end there's even a link where we'll match you up with speakers. So if you don't know somebody to fill that spot, we've got tons of students and clients who are trained on how to deliver a good talk, and they'll help you out. It's only free. Nobody's going to charge you for this. I want my clients to speak. I think it's thepublicspeakingstrategist.com/organizer. So if you're an organizer, and you need help curating your lineup, the workbook will take you through that exercise I just mentioned so that you're creating a transformation, and not just the opposite.

Krista:
I love that. I love that. That's an incredible resource. And I'll add that one to the show notes as well. Okay, our hosts have an incredible speaker lineup, now what can they do to make sure those speakers are going to get results? What do you like to see hosts do to make sure you and your clients are actually set up to be able to get results outside of pick them for the right topic or an end event.

How You Can Help Your Speakers Get Results

Jessica:
For me there's a couple things that I look for, and I'm going to just think about what in particular, because I just said yes to one. I hardly say yes to online summits, and I'm just going to clarify why if you're not sure if you should say yes or no on online summits. Because my audience typically doesn't watch online summits, and I'm in the market of conversions, I'm in tier two, so I want to be in front of my people. Just so you have an example of what I said earlier. But this one is for a client of mine. Of course I'm going to be on her summit. I don't care about the conversions, I want to go serve her people. She has one coming up.

Jessica:
The things that I am looking for is, is she doing her due diligence to educate her audience around what they can expect from this. That's really important. And like I mentioned before, if we're not clear on the transformation that they can expect, they're not going to expect to do any work. And we do need our people to do work in order to get a result. We have to just condition them from the beginning that this isn't just for you to absorb a bunch of content. Here's what I want for you to be able to do at the end of it. If we're able to really paint the picture of the path the audience will be walking through, I think that is incredibly valuable.

Jessica:
Two, I love when the organizer preps their speakers. Just regurgitate everything I said on the podcast. I won't be mad. Just send them this episode link, really it's what you do. Send them this link, and tell them to listen because that piece about the transformation, they probably don't know that and it's not their fault. But as the organizer, now that you've listened to this episode, I'm going to hold you accountable if they aren't sure of how to create that transformation. I think it's incredible as a host, if you can give them some guidance on what you've seen has worked best. You don't have to tell them what to do. But if you're letting them know, "Hey, what I've seen in the past with my speakers is people who just throw up an opt-in, or who try to pitch this big thing, they don't really make the same conversions. However, when it's something that continues on from what they talked about," by giving them guidance on how to get that transformation, you're serving them so, so well.

Krista:
I mean, I have a presentation guidelines PDF that I send my speakers, and I give them steps, but that's something I haven't included, and I can see just like one or two sentences is all it would take to tweak the way they're looking at it a little bit, and make them deliver a presentation that's going to really impact the audience, but also them and their business. And that one tip is so incredibly powerful. I feel like this is going to be it, but my last question is, what is the biggest takeaway you'd like listeners to get from what we've talked about today?

Your Biggest Takeaway

Jessica:
I think it's this. I think that at the end of the day, I want you to remember that you are in the business of delivering transformations, and when you really get away from this almost scarcity trap of feeling like if I don't say yes to the opportunity, if I don't throw up this opt-in, if I don't pitch my big course, that it's not going to work for me. And you started thinking about how can I really help this audience, in a smart way, that you really will see a complete transformation in the way this works for you. You're building solid relationships, you're creating a ripple effect, and people will get results, and when people get results, they come back.

Krista:
Yes, they do. Oh my gosh. Thank you so much for all of this, Jessica. Where can people go to learn more about you and what you offer? I'll include the links to those two freebies in the show notes, but if there's a specific social media platform or anything like that, we'd love to hear about it.

Jessica:
You can come hang out with me on Instagram. I'm not the most consistent person there-

Krista:
It's always good stuff though when you're there.

Jessica:
But it's me, and I'm hanging out. If you got questions. I do like to show sometimes the behind the scenes of what I'm working on. So you'll get sneak peeks of people's talks, and all the strategy that goes into building things. But if you are somebody who's willing to speak or you are somebody who's hosting events, and you want to just create a better experience for your speakers, all the gold's going to be over on the podcasts because whatever you need, we're just going to give it to you and that's The Creative Speaker podcast.

Krista:
Yeah, all of her stuff is so good you guys. And even following along on those behind the scenes Instagram stories. One, it's always fun to see someone's process, but it can give you such a great look at what you should be doing when you're crafting talks or looking at speakers. It's so inspiring. Thank you so much for being on and sharing all of this gold today, Jessica, I really appreciate it.

About Jessica

Jessica Rasdall is a Motivational Speaker, Best Selling Author, Public Speaking Strategist and the host of The Creative Speaker Podcast. She partners with small business owners to craft stories and presentations that connect with their audience and convert from the stage. Jessica has shared her story of turning her “mess into a message” for over thirteen years and has been featured on major international media outlets such as ABC's 20/20, Katie Couric, The Guardian, MTV, Netflix and much more.

When Jessica was a freshman in college, she made a life-altering decision that resulted in the death of her best friend. In an effort to raise awareness, cope with her guilt and keep her friend’s memory alive, she began sharing her story. Jessica spoke to over 15,000 young adults across the country before she was sentenced to prison.

By rewriting their story, her clients are transforming what were once considered limitations into some of their greatest business assets.

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